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WEST HUFSTEDLER FAMILY

Mary's GENERATION 5
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abt. 1750

 

Generation No. 5

 

      16.  William West (Source: They Were Here vol 5,  GREENE COUNTYCompany District Muster Roll No. 3. First Battalion 1st Regiment. Greene County - Sept. 7, 1793 State of Georgia.), born Abt. 1750 in Rockingham Co., VA; died 1831 in Greene, TN.  He was the son of 32. John WEST.  He married 17. Mary Rutherford Abt. 1770.

      17.  Mary Rutherford, born Abt. 1750 in VA; died Unknown in Ottway Community, Greene, TN.  She was the daughter of 34. Thomas RUTHERFORD and 35. Mary W

They Were Here vol5 

GREENE COUNTY

Company District Muster Roll No. 3. First Battalion 1st Regiment. Greene County

 Sept. 7, 1793     State of Georgia

A muster Roll and Inspection of Arms and Acutriments of the Gentlemen of Arms Officered liable to do Militia Duty by the Militia Law of this State Residing in my Militia Company District Commenceing (sic) at - Begining at Hugh Halls thence to Brownings Meeting house Thence to John Wilsons thence up Fishing including Joseph Buchanan to County line thence along sd County line to where the Battalion strikes sd then to Joshua Houghtons thence along sd Battalion line to Barns Holloways thence along sd line to where it crosses Rich Land Creek thence to Begining

 

Listed Pvts., Ellis West and William West

More About William West:

Burial: Gap Creek, Greene, Co., TN

 

More About Mary Rutherford:

Burial: Ottway Community, Greene, TN

 

Children of William West and Mary Rutherford are:

       8             i.      James West, born 12 Oct 1772 in Page Co.,VA; died 05 Feb 1834 in Hawkins, TN; married Nancy Grigsby 1798 in Rogersville, Hawkins Co. TN.

                     ii.      Edward West

                    iii.      Nancy West, born 1780 in Rockingham Co., VA; died Unknown; married Michael Moyers 15 Apr 1796 in Greene Co., TN.

More About Michael Moyers and Nancy West:

Marriage: 15 Apr 1796, Greene Co., TN

 

                    iv.      Elizabeth West

                     v.      Mary West, born 24 Jun 1781 in Rockingham Co., VA; died 20 Jan 1862 in Greene  Co., TN; married William Malone 31 Mar 1803 in Greene Co., TN; born 1781; died Unknown.

More About William Malone and Mary West:

Marriage: 31 Mar 1803, Greene Co., TN

 

                    vi.      Rebeckah West

                   vii.      Charles West, born in Rockingham Co., VA; married Sarah Phillips 23

 

                  viii.      Reuben West, born 26 Jan 1785 in Augusta, VA; died 26 Jan 1873 in Green Co., TN; married Catherine Myers 22 Jan 1805 in Greene Co., TN; died 30 Dec 1868 in Green Co., TN.

                    ix.      Lydia West, born 1790 in Greene  Co., TN; married Christian or Christopher Moyers 30 Oct 1807 in Greene Co., TN.

                     x.      Eleanor West, born 1787 in Rockingham Co., VA; died 1875 in Greene  Co., TN; married John Couch 20 Dec 1807

                    xi.      Richard West

                   xii.      Sarah West, born 1788 in Rockingham Co., VA; died Abt. 1860 in Greene  Co., TN; married Osborne Jeffers.

                  xiii.      Ruth West, born 1796 in Greene  Co., TN; died Unknown; married Beverly T. Smith 27 Jul 1813.

                  xiv.      Elizabeth West, married John Lindsay.

                   xv.      John West, born Abt. 1771; died Unknown; married Sarah Robers 30 Jan 1800 in Rockingham Co., VA.

 

      18.  John Jr. Grigsby (Source: awkins County Court House, Rogersville, Tennessee, WILL OF JOHN GRIGSBYPage 214Dated: Sept. 28, 1826.), born 15 Oct 1752 in Culpepper Co. VIrginia; died 28 Sep 1826 in Hawkins, TN.  He was the son of 36. John Grigsby and 37. Rosanna Etchinson.  He married 19. Winifred Elizabeth Breeden 06 Apr 1778.

      19.  Winifred Elizabeth Breeden (Source: Her father's Family Bible came to her possession and is now called the Breeding / Grigsby Bible and is housed at the Historial Society in Bell County,.), born 27 Aug 1757 in VA.; died 1830 in Hawkins, TN.  She was the daughter of 38. John Breeden and 39. Winnifred Elizabeth Ashby.

Notes for John Jr. Grigsby:

The records show that John Grisby served as a private of Captain John Willis's Company, 2nd Virginia Regiment, commanded by Christian Febiger, Esquire and later by Alexander Spottswood, Esquire.  His name appears on the rolls of the company for the period from June 1777 to Feb. 1778

 

He had participated in the Battle of Point Pleasant as a member of Capt. William Nalle’s company of Augusta Volunteers during Lord Dunsmore’s War

 

Very closely associated with them was Winifred’s brother James; also the family of Michael Roark, who had married John Grigsby’s sister, Letitia. All these men are believed to have been “old Army buddies.”  Furthermore, Michael had been Lieutenant in the company in which Winifred’s brother Spencer had served.

 In 1789, this whole group of people moved to Hawkins County, Tennessee, where they spent the remainder of their days.  When in his old age, Michael Roark, wishing to apply for a Revolutionary soldier’s pension, wrote to Spencer in Russell County, Virginia; and Spencer prepared an affidavit confirming his service.

 

The original will books of the county were destroyed about 1863, but the County court clerk, sometime after the Civil War, copied the wills from the surviving loose papers that he was able to read. Most of the originals are preserved in the Hawkins County Court House, Rogersville, Tennessee. Some of the standard religious preambles were omitted or shortened for the saving of space on our server. In such instance they have been marked with ".....".

 

WILL OF JOHN GRIGSBY

 

Page 214         Dated: Sept. 28, 1826

Know all men by these presents that I John Grigsby of the County of Hawkins and State of Tennessee, being sick and weak of body but of sound mind and memory do this day make my last Will and Testament. First of all, I give and commend my life into the hands of Almighty God who gave it and my body to the Earth from whence it sprang. I give and bequeath to my wife Winney Grigsby my negro man Will and his family, Viz: Susan, Frank and Gibson, as long as she lives. I give and bequeath to my son Nathaniel Grigsby and Ashby Grigsby all my lands and tenaments lying on the south side of Holston River adjoining on the west to James Sanders' land and to James Bredens' line on the east to be equally divided between them. Nathaniel Grigsby is to have the part of the land I now live on, together with the buildings. The said Nathaniel Grigsby and Ashby Grigsby are to have no part of the remainder of my lands. My negro man Will is to be no longer a slave after the death of me and my wife Winney Grigsby; he shall be allowed to live with any of the children as he pleases or with anybody else. I give and bequeath to my daughter Judy Smith ten dollars out of my Estate and all I have gave her and no more. I give to my daughter Elizabeth Rutherford and John Rutherford her husband ten dollars out of the Estate I now have and all I have gave them and no more. I give to my daughter Fanny Wood, dec'd and John Wood her husband ten dollars out of my estate and all I have gave them and no more. I give to my daughter Polly Smith and James Smith her husband ten dollars out of my estate and all I have gave them and no more. I give to my daughter Winney Rutherford and John Rutherford her husband ten dollars out of my estate and all I have gave them and no more. William Grigsby my son is to have $235.00 out of my estate over and above an equal share of the remainder of my estate lands excepted being indebted for the value and all I have gave him and no more. James Grigsby is to have an equal share of my Estate, lands excepted. Also Samuel Grigsby is to have an equal share of my Estate lands excepted. John Grigsby is to have the price of a plantation out of my estate to be worth Five Hundred Dollars and equal part of the estate. Nancy West and her husband James West is to have an equal share of my Estate, lands excepted. Lucy Murrel [Herrial--see original] is to have an equal share of my estate, lands excepted, and negro Ede and negro Alcy also. I give to my two grand daughters Louisiana Smith and Minerva Smith a negro girl named Rose and all I have give them shall be theirs and no more. So this my last Will and Testament whereunto I have set my hand and affixed my seal, This twenty eighth day of September, 1826.

N.B. I will that my son James Grigsby be appointed Guardian for Louisiana and Manerva Smith, my grand daughters over the negroes I have gave them above mentioned.

John x Grigsby (Seal) (his mark)

Witness: Jesse Creech

 

More About John Jr. Grigsby:

Military service: Bet. Jun 1777 - Feb 1778, 2nd Virginia Regiment  Private

 

More About John Grigsby and Winifred Breeden:

Marriage: 06 Apr 1778

     

Children of John Grigsby and Winifred Breeden are:

       9             i.      Nancy Grigsby, born 1786 in Hawkins, TN; died Bef. 1836 in Hawkins, TN; married James West 1798 in Rogersville, Hawkins Co. TN.

                     ii.      William 'Ole Billy' Grigsby, born 1779 in Culpepper Co. , VA; died Nov 1865 in Hawkins, TN.

                    iii.      Fanny Grigsby, born 1781 in Hawkins, TN.

                    iv.      Lucy Grigsby, born 1785 in Hawkins, TN.

                     v.      Elizabeth 'Betsy' Grigsby, born 1786 in Rockingham, VA; died Bef. 1830 in Hawkins, TN.

                    vi.      Judith Grigsby, born 21 Sep 1788 in Hawkins, TN; died 1863 in AK.

                   vii.      Polly Grigsby, born 1790 in Hawkins, TN.

                  viii.      Winifred 'Winney' Grigsby, born 1792 in Hawkins, TN.

                    ix.      James David Sr. Grigsby, born 1794 in Hawkins, TN; died Oct 1888 in Scott Co., VA.

                     x.      Samuel Grigsby, born 1796 in Hawkins, TN; died in Bradley Co., TN.

                    xi.      John Grigsby, born 1798 in Hawkins, TN.

                   xii.      Ashby Grigsby, born 1800 in Hawkins, TN.

                  xiii.      Nathaniel Grigsby, born 06 Jun 1805 in Hawkins, TN; died 04 Mar 1859 in Hawkins, TN.

More About Nathaniel Grigsby:

Burial: Grigsby-Arnott Cemetery,  Hawkins, TN

 

      20.  George Pointer (Source: (1) Florence Hirnimus: Archives and Records Section,Raleigh, North Carolina: "Revolutionary Army Accounts,"Volume I through XII, Vol. I, pg. 51, f.4: George Pointer,Entry #1199;., (2) Illinois Papers, Document 150 (65-1915) Payroll of Capt. John BOYLES Companyof Lincoln Militia against the Shawnee ., (3) 1787 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.., (4) 1788 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.., (5) 1790 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.., (6) 1792 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.., (7) 1795 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.., (8) "Revolutionary Army Accounts", Volume1, page 51, folio 4, issued 12 June 1783.., (9) State of North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources, Division of Archves and History, George's voucher is in Vol. 1, page 51, folio 4. ., (10) ILITARY RECORD: Shirley O'Neil, DAR Lineage Research Chairman for Maryland; Document 150 (22 Oct - 24 Nov 1782)., (11) GEORGE ROGERS CLARK AND HIS MEN, Military Records, 1778-1784:  Document 85 (20 April - 20 May 1782), GEORGE ROGERS CLARK AND HIS MEN, Military Records, 1778-1784:  Document 85 (20 April - 20 May 1782).), born Abt. 1750 in Ky or VI.  He was the son of 40. John Pointer.  He married 21. Betsea Unknown.

      21.  Betsea Unknown, born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

Notes for George Pointer:

Served during the American Revolutionary War.

 

MILITARY RECORD: Shirley O'Neil, DAR Lineage Research Chairman for Maryland;

Document 150 (22 Oct - 24 Nov 1782), Pay Role of Capt. John Boyle Company of Lincoln Melitia in actual Service on an Expedition against the Shawnee Commanded by George Rogers Clark Brigadier Gen. 1782;

 

From: Florence Hirnimus: Archives and Records Section, Raleigh, North Carolina: "Revolutionary Army Accounts," Volume I through XII, Vol. I, pg. 51, f.4: George Pointer, Entry #1199; Revolutionary War Pay Vouchers: Pointer, George, voucher #1199, Counties of Washington and Sullivan, unspecified Claims, 12 June 1783;Vol. I, Page 51, Folio 4: Heading: An account of Specie Certificates paid into the Comptrollers Office by John Armstrong Entry Taker for Lands in North Carolina - vizt-Number: 1199,

By whom Granted: Bledsoe & Williams;

To whom Granted: Geo. Pointer;

Date: 12 June 1783; Sum: 7 pounds, 13 shillings;

Interest: 3 shillings, 5 pence;

To what Time: 28 October 1783;

Total Amount principal & Interest: 7 pounds, 16 shillings,

5 pence

 

Illinois Papers, Document 150 (65-1915) Payroll of Capt. John BOYLES Company of Lincoln Militia against the Shawnee commanded by George Rogers CLARK, Brig. Gen., 1782 includes the names of George POINTER, John POINTER, Samuel DAVIS, William MORRISON and William HALL.

 

GEORGE ROGERS CLARK AND HIS MEN, Military Records, 1778-1784:  Document 85 (20 April - 20 May 1782) Capt. John MARTINS Co. Militia includes the names of Samuel DAVIS, Lieut., Joseph DAVIS, Sgt., George POINTER, Pvt., and Thomas POINTER, Pvt.

 

1787 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.

1788 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.

1790 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.

1792 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.

1795 Tax List Lincoln Co., KY.

 

George Pointer was on payroll of Capt. John Boyle Co. of Lincoln Militia on expedition by George Rogers Clark. Pay coucher was issued in North Carolina "Revolutionary Army Accounts", Volume 1, page 51, folio 4, issued 12 June 1783.

 

   George served with George Rogers Clark. He was on the payroll of Capt. John Martins company of Militia in 1782, and on the pay role of Capt. John Boyle company of Linclon Melitia in actual Service on an Expedition against the Shawney Commanded by George Rogers Clark Brigadier Genl. 1782. At the State of North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources, Division of Archves and History,  George's voucher is in Vol. 1, page 51, folio 4.

 

In 1782 the British and Native Americans disastrously defeated the Kentuckians in the battle of Blue Licks. The ensuing unrest led Clark, who had not taken part in the battle, to lead another expedition northward against the Native Americans and again establish control of the region. His services had been rewarded by the rank of brigadier general in the Virginia militia, and he was made an Indian commissioner.

 

  Clark built Fort Jefferson on the Mississippi, 4 or 5 m. below the mouth of the Ohio, in 1780, destroyed the Indian towns Chillicothe and Piqua in the same year, and in November 1782 destroyed the Indian towns on the Miami river. With this last expedition his active military service virtually ended, and in July 1783 he was relieved of his command by Virginia

     

Children of George Pointer and Betsea Unknown are:

       10           i.      William Pointer, born Abt. 1774 in KY; died Abt. 1820 in Glasconade, MO; married Sarah 1803 in Gasconade Co., MO.

                     ii.      Joesph Pointer, born Unknown; died 1822 in Gasconade Co., MO; married Alse Tacket.

                    iii.      George Pointer (Source: Will Book A, Page 11 Gasconade Co. MO.), born 1780 in KY; died 23 Dec 1823 in Gasconade Co., MO; married Joannah Tacket 01 Sep 1801 in Wayne Co,, KY; born Abt. 1785 in NC; died Unknown.

 

Notes for George Pointer:

Will Book A, Page 11

Will of George Pointer Deceased. In the name of god Amen I George Pointer infirm in body but in mind sound and in memory strong make this my last will and testament first I commend my body to the ground and my soul to God that gave it. first I wish my lawfull debts paid out of my land and the remainder horses cattle with my stock of hoggs and household furniture and all the property that I own to remain in her possession for to raise my children and for their use this 3rd day of October Anno 1823. To my wife Joanna Pointer I give one Negro girl named Doll with the above named property for to raise my children day and date above written.

 

HiS   George X Pointer       mark   Witnesses present   Fredrick Barbrick

                                 His  Leonard X Reed          mark

 

Recorded October 28 AD 1823     D Waldo Clk by D Edwards DC

 

Notes for Joannah Tacket:       DOCUMENTS: in Gasconade Co. MO

 

Inventory of Estate dated 6 Dec 1823 Bouleware Twp: Witnessed by Bumpas JP, signed by Abraham Derryberry, Thomas Shockley, Lewis David

 

Statement of invoice of Joannah Pointer Executor of will of George Pointer deceased, to David Edwards Dec. 1823 for proof of will, letters of administration, recording appraisement, recording will, filing papers.

 

Bond in amount of $550 filed 24 Nov 1823 by Joana Pointer executrix of estate of George Pointer. Philip & William Tacket have signed bond with her and it is assigned by David Edwards, Deputy Clerk.

 

List of sale items from estate. Purchasers include Joannah Pointer, James Jet, Thomas Bittick, John Wyatt, Lewis David, Henry Cowin, Philip Tacket.

 

Authority for Joannah Pointer to serve as administrator of estate. dated 24 Nov. 1823 and signed by David Waldo and David Edwards.

 

Copy of account against estate of George Poynter dec from John Phillips for $10.00 dated June 1 1827.

 

Gasconade Circuit Court October Term 1823: William Pryor against George Pointer, discontinued at cost of plaintiff. Bills to D.C. Edwards for issuing subpoenas, to David Waldo, Clerk for discontinuance and bail bond, and to Sheriff Clark for serving subpoenas. Dated 14 February 1824.

 

Edwards vs. Joanah Poynter for bill for Aug 1827

 

Action of John Phillips vs Joanah Poynter Exc. in Gasconade County Court August Term 1827. Notice to attend the court on first Monday in August to answer demand upon the estate. Signed by John Phillips, June 12 1827 (her brother-in-law).

 

Receipt from Joannah Poynter four dollars and fifty cents in full of all demands for schooling her children. Oct 25 1830 J.B. Harrison

 

Gasconade County Court August Term 1827: Complaint of John Phillips against Joanah Poynter who has not paid him the amount due from her husband's estate.

 

Sale of "Doll", negro slave to William Reily, lists heirs: James, Thomas, William Poynter, Sally and Thomas Owens, Elizabeth Poynter and Joanah Pointer, and Anny (Hanny) and James Jett, heirs of Joanah Pointer. The document is only signed by James, William Pointer, and John & Joannah Philips. Note below that James Jet is suing Joannah just a few days later.

 

Summons for Thomas Owens to appear in Gasconade County Court on 5th of Feb. 1839 in town of Mt. Sterling to testify for the plaintiff in case where James Jett is suing Joannah Poynter.

 

James Jett gives notice to Joanah Pointer as one of the heirs of George Pointers estate, that she should have to give new security because both former securities are dead (William & Philip Tackett). This is dated 24 Jan 1839, signed James Jett, one of the heirs.

 

Summons for Johanna Pointer executrix of last will & testament of George Pointer to present her accounts for settlement at next term of County Court of Gasconade to be held 4th monday of October 1845, dated 8th day of Oct. 1845 J.B. Harrison, Clerk

Statement by Sheriff John J. McDaniel that he had presented notice to Joanah Pointer 13 Oct 1845.

 

Statement by John Phillips, sworn to by J.B. Harrison 10th of Nov. 1845, that he will administer the estate of George Poynter according to law. The heirs of said Estate are: Hannah, William, Sally, James, Thomas, Elizabeth and Joanah.

 

New Surety Bond issued for John Phillips as principal and William Bumpass and Thomas Owens, security, for purpose of administering estate of George Poynter. Dated 10 Nov 1845.

 

Marriage Notes for George Pointer and Joannah Tacket:

Wayne Co. KY Marriage & Vital Records: Vol. 2, pg 90, by

Elliott Jones, J.P., Surety: William Tacket;

George Pointer (Jr) & Joannah Tackett Marriage Bond 1801

Wayne County, Kentucky Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we George Pointer and William Tacket are held And firmly bound unto his excellency

James Garrard Esq. Governor of Kentucky For the time being and his successors in the Sum of Fifty pounds Current Money for The use of the Commonwealth to which Payment will and truly to be made we

Bind ourselves Jointly & Severally firmly By these presents sealed and Dated this Day of 1801 The Condition of the above Obligation

Is such that whereas there has a License Issued from the Clerks Office of Wayne County for a Marriage intended between The above bound George Pointer and Joannah Tacket of this County. If therefore there be no lawful cause to Obstruct the same then this obligation To be void Else to remain in full force

Signed & ack' George Pointer  in presence of William Tacket

M Taul C W C;

 

More About George Pointer and Joannah Tacket:

Marriage: 01 Sep 1801, Wayne Co,, KY

 

                    iv.      Elizabeth Pointer, born 1791 in KY; died Unknown.

                     v.      Mary Pointer, born 1797 in Wayne, KY; died Unknown; married John Phillips; born Unknown; died Unknown.

                    vi.      Betsea Pointer, born Unknown in Mercer, KT; died Unknown; married Phillip Tackett Aug 1802 in Wayne Co,, KY; born Unknown; died Unknown.

Marriage Notes for Betsea Pointer and Phillip Tackett:

Bond for Betsea Pointer and Phillip Tackett-Wayne Co, KY-1802

More About Phillip Tackett and Betsea Pointer:

Marriage: Aug 1802, Wayne Co,, KY

 

                   vii.      Cornelius Pointer, born Unknown; died Unknown; married Rebecca Snow

                  viii.      John Pointer, born Abt. 1790 in Wayne, KY; died 1814 in St. Louis, MO; married Louisa McGowan; born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

      24.  Thomas Cox  He married 25. Sarah Unknown.

      25.  Sarah Unknown

 

Notes for Thomas Cox:

Research into indicates the Cox surname is probably English and refers to the occupation of keeping chickens (or cocks). The first appearance of the Cox name is about 880AD. Family legend says the family was from England as well, and that it was one of the founding families of Greene County, TN. Is said the reason they lived sometimes in all three states is that they were from the foothills of the Smoky Mountains near the borders of North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

     

Child of Thomas Cox and Sarah Unknown is:

       12           i.      William Cox, born 27 May 1770 in NC; died 1814 in White Co., TN; married (1) Mary Ruth Boring; married (2) Mary Dillard Abt. 1799 in Va..

 

      26.  Thomas Dillard (Source: (1) The Goads - A Frontier Family (second Edition, 1995) by Kenneth Haas, page 10., (2) Revolutionary War Muster Rolls, 1775-1783., (3) Revolutionary War Records Virginia Section II, (18) Document No. 44 (18) List of Non-Commissioned Officers and Soldiers of the Virginia Line on Continental Establishment, Whose Names Appear on the Army Register and Who Have Not Received Bounty Land, Richard, 1835., (4) The History of Pittsylvania County Virginia  by Maud Carter Clement,   Regional Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1981, Pittsylvania County Furnishes the Army, August 1781., (5) Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia,, Vol. 1, by William Meade     Philadelphia:J.B. Lippincott, 1857, Article XXXIII., (6) Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia,, Vol. 1, by William Meade     Philadelphia:J.B. Lippincott, 1857, Article XLVII., (7) Family History   Author: Lucy Henderson Horton  Call Number: R929.1H82   Press of the News, Tennessee 1922, page 58., (8) Family History   Author: Lucy Henderson Horton  Call Number: R929.1H82   Press of the News, Tennessee 1922, page 69, 154. 55,., (9) Gleanings of Virginia, page 84., (10) Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, VA   Author: Raleigh Travers Green   Call Number : 2330 Southern Book Company, Baltimore, 1958., (11) Colonial American, 1607-1689 VA Census Index., (12) The Settlements, Carroll Co., VA.  1765-1815, by John Perry Alderman's    Caroll C.), died 1820 in Patrick Co., VA.  He was the son of 52. James Dillard and 53. Sarah Ann Post.  He married 27. Ruth Goad.

      27.  Ruth Goad, born Abt. 1750 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died Aft. 1821 in Patrick Co., VA.  She was the daughter of 54. Abraham Goad and 55. Joanna Wheatley.

 

Notes for Thomas Dillard:

Notes for THOMAS DILLARD:

Haas, Kenneth F., "The Goads - A Frontier Family", (2nd Edition, 1995), p. 10:

      "... one of the Revolutionary militia captains for Pittsylvania County

 Thomas Dillard & Ruth Goad

 

Search Terms: DILLARD (35), THOMAS (11044)

Database: Revolutionary War Muster Rolls, 1775-83

Combined Matches: 2

 

 

 

Surname Given Name Middle Initial Company Unit Rank - Induction Rank - Discharge Notes ROLL-BOX ROLL-EXCT

DILLARD THOMAS       CORPL     112  

DILLARD THOMAS       CORPORAL     112  

 

Search Results

Database: Full Context of Virginia Revolutionary War Records

Combined Matches:

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Revolutionary War Records VIRGINIA

SECTION II (18) [DOCUMENT No. 44] (18) LIST OF NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE VIRGINIA LINE ON CONTINENTAL ESTABLISHMENT, WHOSE NAMES APPEAR ON THE ARMY REGISTER AND WHO HAVE NOT RECEIVED BOUNTY LAND, RICHMOND, 1835.

 

Dillard, Thomas, Soldier, Inf.

 

. The History of Pittsylvania County Virginia by Maud Carter Clement, Regional Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1981

 

 Pittsylvania County Furnishes the Army, August 1781

 

 "At a meeting of the Field Officers and Magistrates, on Friday the 10th, August, 1781, for the purpose of Laying out the County into districts to furnish an Equal proportion of clothes and beef for the use of the Army, Ralph Smith is appointed Receiver to the within district and it is order that he call together the Inhabitants of the same and proceed according to Law. Teste: James Roberts, Thomas Dillard, John Dix, John Wilson, Ben Lankford, County Commissioners. Abram Shelton, Clerk"

 

Dillard, Thomas -

Meade, William. Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia, Volume I. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1857.

 

Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia.

Article XXXIII.

 

The following list of vestrymen, commencing in 1739, will show who were the leading men in all the civil and ecclesiastical matters of the parish and county:--Richard Roy, Richard Johnson, Henry Hickman, Edward Ware, Thomas Foster, Thomas Dudley, John Collier, Gawin Corbin, Valentine Ware, Roger Gregory, Richard Anderson, John Robinson, Benjamin Needler, Robert Dudley, John Livingston, Robert Gaines, Philip Roots, John Ware, Richard Shackleford, William Taliafero, John Strakey, William Lyne, Charles Collier, Thomas Thorpe, Thomas Langford, John Shackleford, John Foster, Philip Roots, Francis Gaines, John Whiting, Thomas Reade Roots, John Whiting, James Prior, Thomas Dillard, Lyne Shackleford, Hon. Richard Corbin, William Hall, John Taylor Corbin, Benjamin Robinson, Humphrey Garrett, Richard Bray, James Didlake, Philip Taliafero, Lyne Shackleford, Jr., Thomas Dillard, John Kidd.

 

Old Churches Ministers, and Families of Virginia.

Article XLVII.

 

As to the ministers of Camden parish before the revival of the Church in Virginia, we find but one on all our lists. In the year 1774,--seven years after the establishment of the parish,--we find the name of the Rev. Lewis Guilliam. Would that we could find it nowhere else! but, alas, on examining the records of the court, we there find his name, not connected with the registry of baptisms and marriages, as perhaps none would call on him for these offices, but with continual petty law-suits, in which he was almost always the loser. Shame and contempt covered his whole life. He was a Scotchman, and never married. As to churches, I have heard of one about twenty miles from the court-house. In the year 1773, Mr. Richard Chamberlaine, of St. Peter's Church, New Kent, conveyed to the vestry, for one hundred and sixty pounds, five hundred and eighty-eight acres of land. On this land the Rev. Mr. Guilliam lived. One of the vestrymen, to whom the land was conveyed,--John Donelson,--emigrated to Tennessee, and was the father of Mrs. General Jackson. The glebe lay on the road to Henry Court-House, a few miles from "Callands." It doubtless shared the fate of other glebes. The other vestrymen were John Pigg, Crispin Shelton, John Wilson, Peter Perkins, Thomas Dillard, Hugh Innes, Theodoric Lacy, Abram Shelton, George Rowland, Robert Chandler, and William Witcher.

 

Family History  Author: Lucy Henderson Horton

Call Number: R929.1H82

 

This book contains the family history of the Hughes, Dalton, Martin, Henderson families of Virginia.

Bibliographic Information: Horton, Lucy Henderson. Family History. Press of the News. Tennessee 1922.  pg. 58

Captain Thomas Dillard, his son, was of the Continental line of the Pittsylvania county regulars. On pages 255-257 of the American Monthly Magazine, of the Daughters of the American Revolution, for June, 1912, where quotation is made from original county records, we see something of the services of these Dillard brothers in the Revolution. George Dillard, who was the grandfather of Mrs. Ella (Hughes) McKinney of Nashville, Tenn., served in his brother's (Capt. Thos. Dillard) company. On page 256 we see that Capt. Thomas Dillard in June, 1776, with Lieutenant Jesse Heard and Ensign Robert Dalton, commanded a company of minute men under Gen. Andrew Lewis, and they marched against Gwynne's Island. These men were called "Shirt Men," because they wore hunting shirts. "This company under Captain Thomas Dillard marched from Pittsylvania through the counties of Halifax, Charlotte, and Dunwiddie to the town of Petersburg, crossed James river at Cobhams, and proceeded by way of Jamestown and Clever's tavern until Gwynne's Island was reached. Here they were stationed five or six weeks under Gen. Lewis and took part in the battle of Gwynne's Island, fought July 9, 1776." On page 257 we find: "In Jan., 1778, Captain Thomas Dillard and Lieuetnant Chas. Hutchings commanded a company of militia that marched direct from Pittsylvania to Isaac Riddles' house, twelve miles above the Long Island of Holston river; thence on to Boonsboro, Kentucky, where they were stationed three months. Later, some of Capt. Thomas Dillard's company, among them his brother George, serving under Colonel George Rogers Clark, marched into the country known as the Illinois, of which they took possession."

 

pg. 69

George Dillard was an uncle of General John Dillard, whose wife was Matilda. He was a brother of Capt. Thos. Dillard of the Continentinal line of of the Pittsylvania county Regulars. On pages 255-257 of the American Monthly Magazine, of the D. A. R., for June, 1912, where quotation is made from the original county records, we learn something of the services of these Dillard brothers in the Revolution (see also in this book "Matilda Hughes Dillard"). George served in his brother's (Capt. Thomas Dillard) company.

 

pg. 154

 In June, 1776, Captain Thomas Dillard and Ensign Robert Dalton commanded a company of minute men. They marched from Pittsylvania through the counties of Halifax, Charlotte and Dunwiddie to the town of Petersburg, crossed James river at Cobham's, proceeding on by way of Jamestown and Cleve's old tavern until Gwynes Island was reached. Here they were stationed for five or six weeks under General Lewis, and took part in the Battle of Gwynes Island, fought July 9, 1776. In 1778 we find that Captain Thomas Dillard commanded a company that marched direct from Pittsylvania to Isaac Riddle's house, twelve miles above the Long Island of the Holston river, thence on to Boonsboro, Kentucky, where they were stationed three months.

 

pg. 55

 

The Dillard family were originally Church of England people. On page 15, Vol. II, Old Churches and Families of Virginia, by Bishop Meade, it can be seen that Thomas Dillard was vestryman of Camden parish, Pittsylvania county, Va. This same family took part in Colonial wars (see page 84, Gleanings of Virginia, and Henning's Statutes)

 

Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, VA  Author: Raleigh Travers Green        Call Number: 2330

Embracing a revised and enlarged edition of Dr. Philip Slaughter's earlier History of St. Mark's Parish, this 1958 volume is rich with will records, family histories, marriage records, chruch and military records.

 

Bibliographic Information: Green, Realeigh Travers. Genealogical and Historical Notes on Culpeper County, VA. Southern Book Company, Baltimore. 1958

 

 

Colonial America, 1607-1789 VA Census Index

Name State County Location     Page        Year   Age    Sex        Age Ranges Census Type 

 Dillard, George  VA NEW KENT CO.   36               1782                             04-05   

 Dillard, Thomas  VA NEW KENT CO.   36             1782                             09-06

 According to John Perry Alderman's "The Settlements,"Carroll Co. VA.1765-1815,"

 There is a list of Thomas Dillard's children in an estate  appraisal. Patrick Co. VA. Will book 1-200.  In the sketch by Mr. Alderman on Thomas Dillard, six children were named, Mary was referred to as Mary Cock or Cox, her husband

e-mail Mary Anne Sufphin  msutphin @tcia.net    8-11-2000

 

Dillards/Goads

 

Posted by Ken Haas <kennethaas@email.msn.com> on Fri, 11 Aug 2000, in

response to Ruth Goad, posted by Linda Fisher on Fri, 11 Aug 2000

 

 Thomas Dillard died in Patrick County, Va. ca 1820. A deed of agreement as to

 his estate named the six children of he and Ruth (Goad). One child was Mary

 whose husband was Wlliam Cock. (The Cock family did not start using the Cox

 spelling until about the time of the Civil War.) Many of them in

 Grayson/Carroll descend from John Cock and Elizabeth Goad, she being a first

 cousin to Ruth Dillard.William was a son of Reuben Cock and although he was

 closely related to John and Elizabeth, no proof of that relationship has

 surfaced.--- Ken Haas

 

Notes for RUTH GOAD:

From Haas, Kenneth F., "The Goads - A Frontier Family", (2nd Edition, 1995), p. 10: After Revolutionary war went to Montgomery County (now Carroll) and then Patrick County.

Ruth was named in the will of her father as Ruth Dillard, the wife of Thomas Dillard, who was one of the Revolutionary militia captains for Pittsylvania County.  After the war, they came to live for awhile in Montgomery (present Carroll County) County, among their Goad kinsmen and then in Patrick County where, in 1821, her children contracted with respect to her husband's estate.  Ruth was living then.

     

Children of Thomas Dillard and Ruth Goad are:

       13           i.      Mary Dillard, born Abt. 1770 in Va; died 1849 in Gasconade Co., MO; married William Cox Abt. 1799 in Va..

                     ii.      Rebecca Dillard, born Abt. 1790; died 04 Sep 1859; married John Bolt 28 Jan 1807 in Patrick Co., VA.

                    iii.      Edward Dillard, born 1789; died 1826.

                    iv.      James Dillard, born 1794; died 1879.

                     v.      American Dillard

                    vi.      Thomas Dillard

                   vii.      Sarah Dillard, born 1780 in VA; died 15 Jun 1849 in Gasconade Co., MO; married John Branson 15 Dec 1803 in Patrick Co., VA.

                  viii.      Ruth Dillard, born Unknown; married William McMillian; born

      28.  Richard Jr. Burgess, born 25 Apr 1762 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died.  He was the son of 56. Richard Burgess and 57. Mary Ursula. 

     

Child of Richard Burgess and unknown is:

       14           i.      John Burgess, born Bef. 1755; died Bef. Apr 1804 in Burke Co,. NC; married Mary McBee.

 

 

      30.  Vardry McBee (Source: (1) The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revollution Vol 64, page 101., (2) South Carolina Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers, pg 592., (3) Jefferson Co., Tennessee article "The McBee Family of Strawberry Plains, Jefferson Co., pg 106., (4) 1790 Anson Co. NC Census., (5) Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769-1923  Vol 3, pg 439  by Moore, John Trotwood and Austin P. Foster, Chicago: SJ Clarke Pub. Co. 1923., (6) The South Carolina Magazine of Anstestral Resarch, Vol IV # 1, Winter 1976, pg 30Vol VI # 3, Summer 1978, pgs 128 & 188Vol VII # 4, Fall 1979, pg 196Vol IX # 3, Summer 1981, pgs 90 & 154., (7) Holcomb, Brent, Tryon Cos., NC  Minutes of the Court of the Pleas & Quarter Sessions  1769-79., (8) History of Echols Family by Milneer Echols written 1850., (9) DeBow's Review 1852 by JB DeBow of New Orleans., (10) The Patriots at Kings Mountain by Bobby Gilmer Moss. Pg168., (11) Some South Carolina Records Vol 2. by Rev Silas E. Lucas Jr. pg. 706., (12) Logan Co. Ky Court Orders Bk. 1 pg 200.., (13) Potraiture of Vardry McBee of South Carolina, DeBow's Review 1852 by JB DeBow of New Orleans., (14) The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 73, page 61., (15) Page Num.  48 Colony of South Carolina                           Compiled by: Paul R. Sarrett, Jr. Records of 1716 to 1783                               Internet: prsjr@aol.com., (16) PineyWoods Chapter, No. 51 Texas Society Sons of the American Revolution.), born 23 Dec 1734 in Bristol Parish,VA; died 1805 in Christian Co., KY.  He was the son of 60. William McBee and 61. Susannah Vardry.  He married 31. Hannah Echols Dec 1758 in Bristol Parrish, Dinwiddie Co., VA.

      31.  Hannah Echols (Source: (1) The Short History of our Family by Milner Echols June 14, 1850The 1850 Milner Echols history has appeared in several different publications.   According to the one source, the original hand-written history "was brought to Texas after the Civil War, probably by Thomas Jefferson Echols, son of Robert Milner Echols of Walton County, Georgia, and grandson of Milner Echols who signed the history in 1850".  In the 1950's the original document was in the possession of an Echols descendant living in Breckenridge, Texas. The Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints has microfilmed the original narrative and a typed transcript of Milner's story.  The film may be ordered through a local Family History Center for a nominal handling charge and viewed at the local FHC. ., (2) The complete list of patriots from:PineyWoods Chapter, No. 51 Texas Society Sons of the American RevolutionPatriots shown with superscript numbers are included in the chapter's membership applications and supplemental applications record books Vols. 1/2 as indicated., (3) The Patriots at Kings Mountain by Bobby Gilmer Moss. Pg168., (4) Man of Reason In an Age of Extremes by Roy McBee Smith; pub 1992., (5) Some South Carolina Records Vol 2. by Rev Silas E. Lucas Jr. pg. 706.., (6) Logan Co. Ky Court Orders Bk. 1 pg 200. Potraiture of Vardry McBee of South Carolina., (7) DeBow's Review 1852 by JB DeBow of New Orleans., (8) The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 73, page 61., (9) PineyWoods Chapter, No. 51 Texas Society Sons of the American Revolution.), born Abt. 1734; died in South Carolina.  She was the daughter of 62. William Echols and 63. Sarah Turner.

 

Notes for Vardry McBee:

Revolutionary War Patriot, Private Silas McBee, age 15, served at Kings Mountain from July to Oct 1781, under Captains J. Thompson and Col. T. Brandon. He served from Nov 1781 - Apr 1782 in Capt Padue's Company South Carolina Regiment and Gen Williams Division. Silas received a pension in 1831 for service. (Pension papers-- Nat'l Archives #506626 Vol 68, pg 145. Pension papers File S7202. Silas was born in South Carolina in 1765 and died in Pontotoc County, Mississippi in 1845. His parents were Hannah Echols and Vardry McBee (1734-abt 1800) During the Rev War their home located in Limestone Springs on Thickety Creek assisted in establishing Spartan District South Carolina. Hannah acted in capacity of nurse to wounded soldiers from Capt. Vardy McBee's Unit and Col. Roebuck's Regiment. Their home was located on Kings Mountain at the village of Limestone Springs. It was inevitable that her entire family would be caught up and involved in the American Revolution. She served the wounded soldiers that clashed with Col. Ferguson and his British troops at the second Battle of Cedar Springs, the Battle of Wofford's Iron Works. Hannah and her daughters Rebecca, Lucy, Mary, Rhoda and Elizabeth remained at home in the face of great danger to attend the wounded South Carolina soldiers. Resources: The Patriots at Kings Mountain by Bobby Gilmer Moss. Pg168 Vardy McBee (1775-1864), Man of Reason In an Age of Extremes by Roy McBee Smith; pub 1992. Some South Carolina Records Vol 2. by Rev Silas E. Lucas Jr. pg. 706. Logan Co. Ky Court Orders Bk. 1 pg 200. Potraiture of Vardry McBee of South Carolina, DeBow's Review 1852 by JB DeBow of New Orleans. Presented by Member--Patricia Alexander.

 

Supplemental

From The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 73, page 61

 

Revolutionary War Patriot, Capt. Vardry McBee commanded a company of militia, South Carolina troops. He was born, about 1750, in Virginia; lived near Livingston Springs, S. C.; died about 1787. Vardry McBee married Hannah Echols.

 

Vardry McBee moved to North Carolina. He was a Constable in Tryon (Now Mecklenburg) County, North Carolina, 1770. Vardry later settled in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, but was then considered in N.C. He belonged to the Society of Friends, but renounced this faith when the Revolution began. He became a captain of militia and was in active service.

 

Captain Vardry McBee (1734-1805) husband of Hannah Echols (daughter of William Echols and Sarah Turner) served as a Captain during the Revolutionary War. The family was Quaker, yet Miner Echols wrote in 1850 that “He was said to have done as much Damage to the British and Torries in that part of the Country as any Capt in that Country.”  He was the constable of Tryon [now Mecklenburg] County, North Carolina

 

In the book "Jefferson County, Tennessee" on page 106, there is an article entitled "THE MCBEE FAMILY OF STRAWBERRY PLAINS, JEFFERSON COUNTY. It is as follows:

 

The McBee family of Strawberry Plains in Jefferson County, were descendants of VARDRY McBee, a revolutionary soldier, of LINCOLN and TRYON COUNTIES, in North Carolina, who probably came to the Watauga Valley and settled for a time, before his death.. Vardry McBee died in Kentucky, after getting sick from rescuing someone from drowning. Vardry was old at this point and living with his son in Kentucky. In the records of WASHINGTON COUNTY Court, on May 27, 1782, it was ordered that a deposition be issued to take the testimony of VARDARY

McBee, George Underwood, William Cooper and others in a suit pending between WILLIAM SAFFOLD & MATTHEW GALE.

The records of Washington District (afterwards Washington County, Tennessee) show that William McBee was living on LICK CREEK about 1781-1782. LEMUEL McBee, the son of Vardry McBee, was born, perhaps in the Watauga Valley of Tennessee, before the State of Tennessee came into existence

 

Lemuel McBee in turn had a son LEMUEL

McBee, born in Jefferson County about 1816, who married MARY LOVE, daughter of JOHN B. LOVE, a native of Western North Carolina. The second LEMUEL McBee was the father of JOHN L. McBee, whose wife was named LIZZIE by whom he had several children.

 

VARDRY McBee, who came to the Watauga Valley by 1780, had several children, whose names are secured from contemporaneous records, largely attributed to him as his progeny because of the dates and names. They were:

 

1. LEMUEL McBee of Jefferson County.

2. WILLIAM McBee of LICK CREEK.

3. VARDRY McBee m. JANE ALEXANDER.

4. GANNUM C. McBee, owner of the famous McBee Ferry.

 

1. LEMUEL McBee (wife's name unknown) is believed to have had:

(1) JAMES A. McBee.

(2) CATHERINE McBee m. M. J. Parrot.

(3) ELIZA McBee m. JOHN M. Saylor.

(4) SAMUEL McBee

Perhaps others.

 

4. GANUM or GAMMON C. McBee lived in KNOX COUNTY and was an extensive land owner and also the owner of the famous McBee ferry, near Strawberry Plains on the Holston river. The ferry was established about 1790 and was located about where the present highway bridge stands today, and is on the line of

Knox and Jefferson Counties. In 1836 McBee was authorized by the County Court of Knox County to erect a toll bridge at the same place.

 

GANNUM C. McBee (No. 4), son of VARDRY McBee, had the following children: His wife was named SARAH.

(1) WILLIAM McBee (born 1826).

(2) ROBERT McBee (born 1829).

(3) ALBERT McBee (born 1835).

(4) LOUISA McBee (born 1838).

(5) GANNUM McBee (born 1842).

(6) AMANDA McBee (born 1843).

 

Among others, SAMUEL McBee (son of LEMUEL) in 1842, was embarrassed by the

fact that his farm lay in both Knox and Grainger Counties. In reply to his petition the Legislature enacted "that the county line between Knox and Grainger, be so altered as to include in Grainger County that portion of the farm on which SAMUEL McBee lives, lying in Knox County".

 

 MILO McBee, brother of SAMUEL and a son of LEMUEL, married CALLOWAY who was born in 1838. In 1850, according to Miss Laura Luttrell's 1850 Census of Knox County, he had two daughters, Sarah and Elnora.

 

VARDRY McBee (son of the first VARDRY, who came to the Watauga Valley) lived in LINCOLN COUNTY, North Carolina, where he married JANE ALEXANDER, one of the members of the famous family of that name in Mecklenburg County.

 

VARDRY McBee and his wife JANE ALEXANDER had five sons, of which one was VARDRY ALEXANDER McBee, who married in 1847, MARY ELIZABETH SUMNER who was the daughter of BENJAMIN SUMNER and his wife SARAH DUKE HUNT, the daughter of Dr. THOMAS HUNT (son of MEMUGAN HUNT) and his wife ELIZABETH DUKE. BENJAMIN SUMNER was of the family of JETHRO HUNT, revolutionary patriot of

North Carolina. VARDRY McBee and Jane Alexander had: JOSEPH, MALINDA PENELOPE, SILASL., LUTHER MARTIN, HANNAH ECHOLS, MARTHA ADALINE, VARDRY A.,

WILLIAM PINKNEY and ALEXANDER McBee. Some went to GREENVILLE, South Carolina.

 

Somewhere, I, believe the families got entangled somehow. The addition of LEMUEL, GANNUM C., and WILLIAM McBee (of Lick Creek) to the known family of VARDRY and HANNAH ECHOLS McBee seems unlikely. Probably they were the children of one of VARDRY'S brothers; either MATTHEW,

JAMES, OR MATHIAS McBee. Certainly, these McBees should be listed in our genealogy. We are all a part of the original MCBEE blood line. (I, Danny A. McBee, hope that someone someday might pursue this more. I won't at the present time).

 

The following is excerpted from the South Carolina Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers, page 592:

 Vardry McBee: He enlisted in the Fifth Regiment on 26 March 1776. He was a captain under Colonel Roebuck from 10 June 1780 to 10 January 1782. At sometime, he supplied provisions for militia use.

(Adair, Joseph); A.A.4877; X845; X1072; X3607; N.A.853.

 

 

Sept. 28, 1789 Vardry McBee (Thickety, Spartanburgh) to William Wofford (Turkey Cove, Burke County, N. C.); for 100 lire sterling sold 1,224 acres in three tracts: (1) 579 acres on both sides North Pacolate River including part of Walnut Mountain; survey May 26, 1787 for Robert Evans; (2) 205 acres on North fork of Trall Creek of North fork Saluda River; survey May 28, 1787 for Robert Evans; and (3) 440 acres on Trall Creek of North Pacolate River including part of Walnut Mountain; survey May 26, (year not given); all were replated and returned to the SC Office of Granting Lands in Vardry McBee's name and it is expected that all have been granted to Vardry McBee.

Witness: Lacyannie McBee and Elizabeth McBee. Signed Vardry McBee. Rec. Jan. 30, 1798.

 

Sept. 26, 1789 Vardry McBee to William Wofford; William is security for a "suit of debt" for Vardry and, by a "misconduct" judgment Col. Odlina (?) Osborn vs William Wofford, William has to pay 400 lire SC money; Vardry can't pay William a like sum, so Vardry mortgages the following land to William: (1) 300 acres on branch of Thickety Creek; including place called Sline (sic) Kilns and where "subscriber" now lives; (2) 400 acres on Fall Creek of Pacolate River in Greenville County called copper mines; (3) 300 acres in Camden District on branch of Buffalo Creek near mouth of it; border: Peper Quin and John Bridges; (4) three other grants for 2900 acres on both sides Doolittle's Creek on East side of Broad River; including three places of iron ore and some slime (sic) stone; and (5) 1,120 acres in three tracts at

head of Pacolate River in Greenville County; bought to Vardry McBee from Jabez Evans

and Robert Evans. Witness Z Taliferro and Henry McCray. Signed Vardry McBee.

Rec. Jan. 30, 1798.

 

Jan. 5, 1794 William Wofford assigns rights to above mortgage to James Wofford for 100 lire sterling. Witness: Thos. Baker.   Signed W. Wofford.

 

March 17, 1787. Vardry McBee (Spartanburgh) to William Wilkins (same); for 10 lire sterling sold 400 acres on both sides Gotes Creek of Thickety Creek; grant April 26, 1767 Gov. William Tryon (NC) to William Sims and William Marchbanks. Witness Wm Thomson, Rhoda McBee and Joshua Preslidge.

Signed   Vardry and Hannah McBee.

 

The 1790 Anson County, North Carolina Census list Vardry Magby as head of household, with wife, one daughter, and four sons under the age of sixteen. Right beside Vardry Magby there was a head of household listing for Rachel Magby by herself. I am not sure that this is our Vardry McBee or not.

There seems to be a coincidence if it is. Vardry McBee is selling land in Spartanburg at this time. This could be the son of one of Vardry McBee's brothers. I don't presume to know who Rachel Magby is. Hopefully someday a better genealogist will figure it out for us.

The Battle of King's Mountain that Vardry and his son Silas participated in only lasted one hour and five minutes. It took place October 7, 1780. Not one man escaped from the battlefield.

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769-1923: Volume 3  MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

James T. Williams was himself born at Greenville in 1845, a son of James T. and Anna (D'Oyley) Williams. His grandfather, Dr. T. B. Williams, was one of the early physicians of Greenville and a man of prominence in his day. The Williams family came originally from Virginia. Before he was sixteen years of age James T. Williams enlisted at Greenville in Company A, Sixteenth South Carolina Infantry, and served throughout the Civil war with his command. He was in campaigns in South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi and toward the close of the war was wounded at the battle of Franklin. Following the close of hostilities he worked at various occupations for very small wages and also did some farming. In 1875 he engaged in the hardware business at Greenville as a member of the firm of Wilkins, Williams & Company. In 1882 he acquired his partners' interests and continued successfully under his own name until 1909, when he retired, having given the business his close attention for a period of thirty-five years. From 1893 until 1901 Mr. Williams occupied the position of mayor of Greenville. At Lincolnton, North Carolina, James T. Williams married Miss Sally McBee of that place, daughter of Vardry A. McBee and granddaughter of Vardry McBee, whose historical prominence as one of the founders and upbuilders of Greenville has been sketched in detail upon other pages of this work. Six children were born to this union, namely: James T. Williams, Jr.; Major Vardry McBee Williams; Lieutenant Colonel Sumner McBee Williams; Major Silas Williams; Miss Mary Elizabeth Williams, living at home; and Miss Sarah McBee Williams, now the wife of Lieutenant D. L. Ryan of the United States navy.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3   MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

James T. Williams, Jr., is now editor-in-chief of the Boston Evening Transcript. He was educated in Furman University, the University of the South, and graduated from Columbia University. At the age of twenty-seven he was a civil service commissioner of the United States by appointment of President Taft. A young man from the state of South Carolina, which originated secession, he is now the editor of the classic of journalism in “Yankeedom,” the Transcript being the typical exponent of the “New England conscience.” He was a member of the Washington staff of the Associated Press from 1902 until 1906 and entered the service of the Transcript as Washington correspondent in 1906. For a time he was also editor of the leading newspaper in Arizona. He has been editor of the Transcript since November, 1912.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3   MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

The second son, Major Vardry McBee Williams, is a graduate of Clemson College and was a major in the National army overseas. Major Sumner McBee Williams, who was educated at Furman University and at West Point Military Academy, has had an active military career and during the World war was lieutenant colonel on the staff of Major General Leonard Wood at Chicago.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3   MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

Major Silas Williams, our immediate subject, received his education in a number of institutions. He attended the Furnam Fitting School, from which he graduated in 1903, and worked as a stenographer for one year after his graduation. He went to Clemson College for one year, then matriculated at the University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee. Here he received the A. B. degree in 1909 and the A. M. degree in the following year. He then completed his education in the Harvard Law School, having received his LL. B. in 1913. During his college career Mr. Williams was very active in athletics. While at the University of the South he played four years on both the football and baseball teams, and for two years was selected as a member of the All-Southern Football Team.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

In the same year Major Williams began the practice of his profession at Chattanooga in the office of Coleman & Frierson, which connection he maintained for two years. He then formed a partnership with Ed Finlay, which continued until the close of the World war, since which time he has practiced alone with substantial success and high honor to himself.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

page 439[p.439] Major Williams' military service began with nine months' service in the National Guard, as first sergeant in Troop B. When the United States became involved with the Mexican government, he spent six months with his command at El Paso, Texas. When he returned from the border he was appointed assistant district attorney of the eastern district of Tennessee and held this office until 1917, when he resigned to enter the Second Officers' Training Camp at Fort Oglethorpe, from which he received the commission of captain in November of that year. He was then ordered to Camp Jackson to act as instructor and from there was transferred to the Camp Taylor Field Artillery Training School, where he was promoted to the rank of major and acted as adjutant of the school. He served at Camp Taylor until the close of the war.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 MAJOR SILAS WILLIAMS.

On December 1, 1917, Major Williams married Miss Elizabeth Duke Lodor, the daughter of Napoleon and Susan (Dabney) Lodor, the former a prominent early settler and manufacturer of Chattanooga.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 HILLIARD WOOD, M. D.

Religiously Major Williams is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal church. He is a member of and served as first president of the Optimist Club. His collegiate fraternity is the Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Politically he votes the republican ticket and was one of the three Tennessee members of the Hayes Platform and Policies committee in 1920. His professional affiliations include the Chattanooga and Tennessee Bar Associations.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 HILLIARD WOOD, M. D.

One of the foremost eye, ear, nose and throat specialists in Tennessee is Dr. Hilliard Wood of Nashville, who is likewise on the staff of the St. Thomas Hospital in this city. A descendant of an old and honored American family, his maternal ancestors having come to this country at a very early period, he was born near Cedartown, Polk county, Georgia, on the 24th of June, 1865. His father, Charles Hilliard Wood, was born in South Carolina and was for the greater part of his life active in agricultural pursuits. He was likewise prominent in civic affairs and was county treasurer of Polk county for some time. In DeKalb county, Georgia, in 1843, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Wood to Miss Evelyn Tarpley Wilson, who was born in Fulton county, that state. She was a member of one of the old and prominent families of Fulton county and her brother. William Wilson, served as sheriff of the county for a number of years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Wood eleven children were born, four boys and seven girls, of whom two boys and three girls are living. Hilliard Wood, whose name introduces this review, was the ninth in order of birth.

 

Tennessee the Volunteer State 1769–1923: Volume 3 HILLIARD WOOD, M. D.

In the acquirement of his early educational training Hilliard Wood attended the rural schools of Polk county, Georgia, and subsequently was graduated from a private school at Cedartown. His studies for the medical profession began in the Atlanta Medical College, at Atlanta, Georgia, where he was a student for one term. He then attended the medical department of Vanderbilt University, which institution conferred the M. D. degree upon him in 1885, he having been awarded the Founder's Medal. The following year the same degree was conferred upon him by the University of Nashville. In 1886 Dr. Wood established offices for the practice of his chosen profession in Nashville and has since practiced here. For some years he enjoyed an extensive general practice but in 1890 specialized in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat and has gained a widespread and most favorable reputation in that connection. He now has well appointed offices in the Independent Life building and is readily conceded by his professional brethren and by the consensus of public opinion, to be one of the leading speclalists in Nashville and throughout the state.

 

 

Source Information:

Moore, John Trotwood and Austin P. Foster. Tennessee, The Volunteer State, 1769-1923, Vol. 3. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1923.

 

The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research

SCMAR, Volume IV

Number 1, Winter, 1976

Two Hidden Marriage Records

 

SCMAR, Vol. IV, Winter 1976, No. 1, p.30

A similar datum appears in the records of an Equity suit in Pinckney, Francis Bremar vs. Vardry McBee et al., brought in order to foreclose a mortgage. In the Answer filed 17 Jan. 1803 by William Lipscomb, he declared that on 26 Nov. 1783 Vardry McBee and William Steen gave bond to Samuel Talbert and Elizabeth Chery of Camden District, and mentioned that at some time between 1789 and 1795, Elizabeth Chery had intermarried with Thomas Weir.

 

The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral ResearchSCMAR, Volume VI

Number 3, Summer, 1978 Marriage and Death Notices from the Greenville Mountaineer (Continued from Vol. 6, p.127)

 

SCMAR, Vol. VI, Summer 1978, No. 3, p.188 On the 16th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Husk, Vardry A. McBee, Esq, to Miss Mary E., daughter of Benjamin Sumner, Esq., all of Lincolnton, N. C. (Ibid.)

 

The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral ResearchSCMAR, Volume VII

Number 4, Fall, 1979 Western Circuit Equity Journal

 

SCMAR, Vol. VII, Fall 1979, No. 4, p.196

On motion of Mr. Farrow ordered that the part of the Defendants' answer which charges the complainant with fraud in his contract with Vardry McBee be struck out of said answer. The Court decreed that the complainant's bill be dismissed with costs.

 

The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research SCMAR, Volume IX

Number 3, Summer, 1981Marriage and Death Notices from the Southern Enterprise (Continued from Vol. IX, p.90)

 

SCMAR, Vol. IX, Summer 1981, No. 3, p.154

On the night of the 6th of October, died William Pinckney McBee, at his residence in Greenville, fourth son of Vardry McBee of Greenville…(long eulogy) Riverside, Oct., 1860. (Ibid.)

 

Source Information:

Wells, Lawrence K, and Brent H. Holcomb, eds. South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. 1-20 [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1999-. Original data from: Wells, Lawrence K, and Brent H. Holcomb, eds. The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research. Vol. I-XX (20). Columbia, S.C.: SCMAR, 1973-1992.

 

 

TRYON COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA MINUTES OF THE COURT OF PLEAS AND QUARTER SESSIONS 1769-1779 April term 1772

On motion of James Forsyth Ordered by the Court that a Road be viewed and opened from the Island Cherokee ford on Broad River & from Will'm Tates Ferry on y'e s'd River Leading the nearest and best way into the trading road leading towards Charles Town & that the following persons be appointed to view & lay out the same viz Geo. Blanton Esq'r, Wm Tate, Wm. McCown, Vardry McBee, Zac'r Bullock, John Nichols, Joab Mitchell, Rob't Wilkins, Rob't Lusk, Nath'l Jeffries, Adam Goudlock, Will Marchbanks, Christ'r Coleman, William Wilkins, Rob't Luney & that they meet at Jacob Randals on the last Tuesday in May to take the Necessary steps to Qualify them for their Charge

 

Description:

The single most important record for any North Carolina county is the minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions. The Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions is the lowest court of record for the county. More people's names appear in this court record than in any other body of county records. Lists of deeds proved and recorded are found in the court minutes, as well as lists of wills proved or administrations on intestate estates taken out. Tryon County was abolished in 1779 to form Lincoln and Rutherford counties. Of the four counties involved in the North Carolina-South Carolina border problem during the colonial period (Tryon, Mecklenburg, Anson, and Bladen), Tryon County is the only one that has extant court minutes for the period prior to the border surveys.

Extended Description:

 

 

Tryon County was in the southwesternmost part of North Carolina. It was formed in 1769 from the western part of Mecklenburg County, and it was bounded on the north by Rowan County. Its western boundary was the Indian line run in 1767, and its southern boundary (the South Carolina line) was not surveyed west of the Catawba River until 1772. The first court for Tryon County was held at the plantation of Charles McLean, a location that is in present-day York County, South Carolina. The border survey of 1772 reduced the size of Tryon County by approximately one-half. Many of the Tryon County grants and plats are included in North Carolina Land Grants in South Carolina, also by Mr. Holcomb.

 

The construcion of roads and the road juries (sometimes called road gangs) who were to lay out and maintain the roads are spelled out in these records. Civil suits involving less than $150 (usually over debt), minor criminal cases, depositions, jury lists, tax officials' names with their districts, tavern licenses and tavern rates, and care of the poor of the county are among the many kinds of records included in the court minutes.

 

The records in this volume were extracted from the microfilm copy (produced by the North Carolina Department of Archives and History) of the Tryon County Court Minutes (C.094.30001). The original volumes from which the microfilm was made are housed in archives in Raleigh. This information has also been published in book form, entitled Tryon County, North Carolina Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessionsby Brent H. Holcomb. A hard-cover version of the book is available from Brent H. Holcomb, P.O. Box 21766, Columbia, SC 29221.

 

Source Information:

Holcomb, Brent, comp. Tryon County, North Carolina, Court Minutes, 1769-79. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data: Holcomb, Brent. Tryon County, North Carolina, Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Session, 1769-79. Columbia, SC: SCMAR, 1994.

 

 

The Old "Ninety-Six" District of South Carolina was created (original)

in 1769 and was abolished in 1798. (The 96th Dist. from 1785 to 1798

consisted of present day Union Co.)

 

It consisted of (present-day) Abbeville Co.   (formed 1785)

   Part of Abbeville Co. to Greenwood Co. (formed 1897)

   Part of Abbeville Co. to McCormick Co. (formed 1916)

Edgefield Co.   (formed 1785)

   Part of Edgefield to Aiken Co.     (formed 1871)

   Part of Edgefield to Greenwood Co. (formed 1897)

   Part of Edgefield to Saluda Co.    (formed 1896)

Laurens Co.     (formed 1785)

Newberry Co.    (formed 1785)

Spartanburg Co. (formed 1785)

   Part of Spartbg. Co. to Cherokee Co. (formed 1897)

Union Co.       (formed 1798)

   Part of Union. Co. to Cherokee Co.   (formed 1897)

 

The following is a list of 2,154 "Residents" of this large Ninety-Six Dist.

M210  McBEE           Vardry           1779 Old 96th D SC  No Twp. Listed

 

 

Vardre McBee moved from Virginia to South Carolina before the Revolutionary War. He was a captain in the army in the Revolution and was said to have done as much damage to the British and Torries in that part of the country as any captain.

 

More About Vardry McBee:

Military service: Capt. in Revolution War  commanded a company of militia, South Carolllna troops. A skirmish was fought near Livingston Springs, SC. near his home and the wounded were taken there and cared for by his wife.

Residence: Moved form VA to SC before the Revolutionary War

 

Notes for Hannah Echols:

 During the Rev War their home located in Limestone Springs on Thickety Creek assisted in establishing Spartan District South Carolina. Hannah acted in capacity of nurse to wounded soldiers from Capt. Vardy McBee's Unit and Col. Roebuck's Regiment. Their home was located on Kings Mountain at the village of Limestone Springs. It was inevitable that her entire family would be caught up and involved in the American Revolution. She served the wounded soldiers that clashed with Col. Ferguson and his British troops at the second Battle of Cedar Springs, the Battle of Wofford's Iron Works. Hannah and her daughters Rebecca, Lucy, Mary, Rhoda and Elizabeth remained at home in the face of great danger to attend the wounded South Carolina soldiers.

 

HISTORY OF ECHOLS FAMILY by MILNER ECHOLS 1850

A short history of our family from the first that landed in America till the present time, as far as I can ascertain----.

 

John Echols an Englishman came to America about the end of the 16th or the beginning of the 17th Century and settled in Caroline County, Virginia, and married a tall redheaded woman named Mary Cave and by her had five sons and three daughters.  I shall begin with his sons first and carry out their family as far as my knowledge extends.

 

John was his first son who left Virginia a young man and settled in the lower part of N. Carolina and raised his family, of whom I know nothing.

 

Abraham was old John’s 2nd son, married Sarah Tamer and by her had two sons and several daughters.  His sons were Joseph and Joshua.  Joseph married a Miss King, and by her had 2 sons and 5 or 6 daughters.  His sons Abraham and Jeremiah who left Virginia in time of the Revolutionary War and went to Pennsylvania.  Of their offspring I know nothing. Joshua married Hannah Brown, had a number of children of whom I know but little.  He had one son Darius, a conspicuous man in Habersham County, GA.  The rest of his family lives chiefly in the upper part of Georgia.  Old Abraham had one daughter who married James Hodges a very worthy man, his family moved to Tennessee. He had one son named Jessee and he had a son named James who was a commanding officer in Tennessee and got drowned in Cumberland River near Cairo. Jessee had one daughter named Tabitha, that is all I know of the family. Old Abraham had another daughter named Sarah who married John Rowden and by her had 4 sons and one daughter. His

sons were Abraham, Laban, Josee, and John. Abraham married a woman named Chick, moved to Tennessee. I know nothing of his family. Laban married Milly Adams raised a large family. I know nothing of them only two of his sons to wit, Hubert and Lot, who live in Guinett County, Ga. Josee married Susannah Adams, moved to Tennessee, of his family I know nothing. John married Milly Brewer, a widow, the daughter of old Jeremiah Reeves, sister to Rev. Malachi Reeves and Rev. Jeremiah Reeves. He also moved to Tennessee and was drowned in the Tennessee River. Of his family I know nothing. Old John Rowden’s daughter was Tabitha. She married Glover Crain, had several children by her and then died. He had one son named Joseph Crane who married a Miss Hood. They had several children, one son named John Glover Crane who was a wholesale merchant in Charleston, S.C. Joshua Crane had a daughter married a Mr.Whitman, a Baptist preacher and a teacher in the Penfield Academy, Green County, Georgia.

P.S. James Hodges daughter married John Lacy. Wm Glass and Hally Shaw Lacy had one son named Elijah and he and wife parted. Glass had 5 sons and 3 daughters. His sons were Hubbard, Mason, Frederick who married Betsy Strother and he was killed by the Indians in Alabama. The other three, David, Elish and Eahlij Mason married a Miss Wyatt and lives in Fayett County, Georgia the rest of his sons I know nothing. His daughters were named Tabitha, Patsy, and Sally. Tabitha married Richard Wood and by him had three sons and one daughter. Her sons were Winston, William and Willis. Her son William represented three different counties in the state of Georgia and was Colo. Of the same counties. He then moved to Randolph County, Alabama and represented that county and is Colo. And judge of the court.

Willis, her third son married a Miss Cochran and died young. Richard Wood’s daughter was named Elizabeth and married Samuel D. Echols. Hally Shaw raised a large family in Jackson County, Georgia. I know nothing of his family only E. B. Shaw, his grandson, who lives in Guynett County, and is a very eminent Baptist preacher.

P. S. If I mistake not, old Abraham Echols had a daughter who married a man by the name of Hubbard in Virginia. I know nothing further of them.

The third son of old English John Echols was named William. I don’t know who he married. He had several sons and daughters. His sons were John and William. John was one of the largest men ever raised in Virginia. He was a Quaker preacher. That’s all I know of him or his family as I never saw him but once. William was also a very large man, married a widow Spradlin. By her had three sons and four daughters. His sons were Joel, Elcanah, and William. Joel and Elcanah moved to Tennessee. Settled on Cumberland River near Caro. I was once at Elcanah’s house after his death. He had a large family. I know the names of none of them only his youngest son named Richard. They are a very wealthy family. Joel I think they told me had no child. William, the third son, married a girl by the name of Elizabeth Farmer - a schoolmate of mine in Virginia. He moved to Alabama, settled in Madison County near Huntsville and was a very great wholesale merchant in that town. I know but very little of his family. He had a daughter married Richard Holden also a wholesale merchant in Huntsville and also had two sons who moved to Mississippi. One of them was killed by a man and the other wrote to me about it.  I think the one that wrote was by the name of Larkin. The one that was killed I think was by the name of Joseph. That’s all that I know of that family.

Old William Echols daughters married William Wynne, Vardre McBee and Daniel Williams and Richard Anderson. Of Wynne’s family I know nothing as they moved to Tennessee in an early date. Old Vardre McBee moved from Virginia to South Carolina before the Revolutionary War and was a Capt. In that army and was said to have done as much damage to the British and Torries in that part of the country as any Capt. In that country. He had two sons, to wit, Silas and Vardre. Silas was a very large man, went to Mississippi and died there. I know nothing of his family. Vardre still lives in South Carolina, Greenville District. He has six children, only one married, that a daughter, married a Mr. Carson. He has one daughter Malinda single, one son Luther, the rest I don’t know their names. He is said to be the richest man in that part of the state. His property is estimated at one million dollars. Old Vardre has several daughters. I don’t know their names. One married a man by name of Ross. How many children she had I know not. I only know one of her sons who is by name of Rice F. Ross. One married a man by name of Asher. They have one son in Dade County, Georgia, by name of William Asher, a very smart man. That is all I know of that family.

She married Vandree MacBee. She had two sons moved from Virginia to South Carolina before the revolutionary war

 

More About Vardry McBee and Hannah Echols:

Marriage: Dec 1758, Bristol Parrish, Dinwiddie Co., VA

     

Children of Vardry McBee and Hannah Echols are:

       15           i.      Mary McBee, born Abt. 1780 in Spartanburg District, South Carolina; died 10 Apr 1825 in Lincolnton, North Carolina; married John Burgess.

                     ii.      Vardry Echols McBee (Source: The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revollution Vol 149, page231.), born 1775; died 1864; married Jane Alexander 1804 (Source: The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revollution Vol 149, page 231.); born 1785; died 1864.

 

More About Vardry Echols McBee:

Burial: Christ Church Episcopal Church Cemetery, Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina

Residence: 1850, Greenville District, SC

 

More About Vardry McBee and Jane Alexander:

Marriage: 1804 (Source: The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revollution Vol 149, page 231.)

 

                    iii.      Silas McBee (Source: The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revollution Vol 73, page 61.), born 24 Nov 1765 in Halifax VA; died Jan 1845 in Pontotoc, MS; married (1) Leodicia Nail; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) Kathrine Katz Unknown; born.

                    iv.      Lemuel McBee, born in Watgugo Valley, TN; died Unknown.

                     v.      Gannum C. McBee

                    vi.      Lucy McBee

                   vii.      Rebecca McBee

                  viii.      Rhonda McBee

                    ix.      Samuel McBee

                     x.      Matthew McBee

                    xi.      Elizabeth McBee

                   xii.      William McBee

                  xiii.      Mathias McBee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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