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WEST HUFSTEDLER FAMILY

Mary's GENERATION 6
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          Early 1700's 

 

Generation No. 6

 

      32.  John WEST, died Aft. 1790.  He was the son of 64. John West and 65. Dorothy.        

Child of John WEST is:

       16           i.      William West, born Abt. 1750 in Rockingham Co., VA; died 1831 in Greene, TN; married Mary Rutherford Abt. 1770.

 

      34.  Thomas RUTHERFORD (Source: (1) Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate Records, Rutherford, Thomas Date : Mar 22, 1771Location : Augusta Co., VARecord Type : ProbateRecord ID : 37531Description : DecedentBook-Page : WB4-396., (2) Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate RecordsRutherford, Thomas Date : Mar 22, 1771Location : Augusta Co., VARecord Type : ProbateRecord ID : 37531Description : DecedentBook-Page : WB4-396Remarks : Elliott (Ellet) Rutherford's bond as guardian to Robert, Joseph, Reuben and Mary Rutherford, orphans of Thomas Rutherford.This probate record was originally published in "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County" by Lyman Chalkley Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate RecordsRutherford, Thomas Date : Aug 19, 1773Location : Augusta Co., VARecord Type : ProbateRecord ID : 37695Description : DecedentBook-Page : WB5-144 .), died 22 Mar 1771 in Augusta Co VA will probated.  He married 35. Mary Wood.

      35.  Mary Wood

Notes for Thomas RUTHERFORD:

Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate Records

 

Rutherford, Thomas Date : Mar 22, 1771 Location : Augusta Co., VA

Record Type : Probate Record ID : 37531 Description : Decedent

Book-Page : WB4-396

Remarks : Elliott (Ellet) Rutherford's bond as guardian to Robert, Joseph, Reuben and Mary Rutherford, orphans of Thomas Rutherford.

This probate record was originally published in "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County" by Lyman Chalkley

 

Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate Records Rutherford, Thomas Date : Aug 19, 1773

Location : Augusta Co., VA Record Type : Probate Record ID : 37695

Description : Decedent Book-Page : WB5-144

Remarks : Recorded, viz: 1770 -- Thomas Rutherford's estate, to Evan Price and Elizabeth, his wife. 9th May -- To Reuben Rutherford, William West, Dochther Knave, James Bruster. 9th May -- By vendue to, viz: Rebecca Paretree, John Dobbins, Evan Philips, Fr

This probate record was originally published in "Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, 1745-1800. Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County" by Lyman Chalkley  [Genealogy.com, LLC, Family Archive #513, Ed. 1, Virginia Land, Marriage and Probate Records,

Children of Thomas RUTHERFORD and Mary Wood are:

       17           i.      Mary Rutherford, born Abt. 1750 in VA; died Unknown in Ottway Community, Greene, TN; married William West Abt. 1770.

                     ii.      Robert Rutherford

                    iii.      Joseph Rutherford

                    iv.      Reuben Rutherford

 

      36.  John Grigsby (Source: (1) 'Apprentices of Virginia'., (2) National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 17 page 245.), born 1720 in Stafford Co. VA; died 07 Apr 1794 in Culpepper Co. , VA.  He was the son of 72. Charles Grigsby and 73. Sarah Wilkerson.  He married 37. Rosanna Etchinson 1746 in Culpepper Co., VA.

      37.  Rosanna Etchinson, born 1735 in Orange Co., VA; died Abt. 1761 in Rockbridge Co., VA.

Notes for John Grigsby:

'Apprentices of Virginia' listed John Grigsby beginning date March 11, 1728,  white male, Occupation: blacksmith for unspecified time.

 

He was a solider in both the Colonial War and the Revolutionary War.  Solider John was one of Augustine Washington's Company at the siege of Carthagene.  In the Revolution, Capt. John Grigsby commanded a company in the 13th Regiment Virginia, Culpepper Virginia Minutemen.

 

National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 17 page 245 

Capt. John Grigsby, (1720-1794) commanded a company in the Thirteenth regiment Virginia Line during the Revolution.  As he had served in two wars he was known as "Soldier John."  He was born in Stafford Co. and died in Rockbridge Co., VA.

 

He died April 7, 1794 and was buried in the cemetery of the Falling Springs Presbyterian Church.  The oldest congregation in the Fincastle Presbytery in Rockbridge Co., VA.  Falling Springs Presbyterian Church was organized before 1748.  The Hanover Presbytery met there in October of 1780.  The present Gothic Revival Church was Constructed of slave made brick during the Civil War.  At the time of it's dedication in April, 1864, General Thomas L. Rosser's Cavalry Brigade was camped here.  The first burial in the present cemetery was that of John Grigsby of Fruit Hill.    The cemetery is located on Route 11, 7 miles south of Lexington, VA.

 

INSCRIPTIONS AT FALLING SPRING CEMETERY.

 

SACRED to the memory of John Grigsby, who was born (???), 1720, and departed this life April 7, 1794.

 

        Pause, reader, here, and look with solemn dread

        Upon the last lone dwelling of the dead.

        Though numerous graves appear on every hand,

        This was the first of all the silent band.

 

 

SOLDIER JOHN GRIGSBY'S WILL

 

        IN THE NAME OF GOD, Amen I John Grigsby of Rockbridge County being at this time in a low state of health but having the due exercise of  reason and knowing the uncertainty of life and that it may please God to call me hence do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament.

      Item  I desire that all my just debts be duly paid.

      Item  I give unto my eldest son James Grigsby five shillings current money of Virginia over and above what he has already received.

      Item  I give unto my son John Grigsby five shillings current money of Virginia over and above what he has already received.

      Item  I give unto my son Charles Grigsby thirty pounds Virginia Currency, likewise a feather bed with furniture and a couple of sheep.

      Item  I give unto my son William Grigsby thirty pounds Virginia currency.

      Item  I give unto my daughter Sarah Welch exclusive of what she has already received twenty-five pounds Virginia currency.

      Item  I give unto my daughter Jane Paxton five shillings current money of the State of Virginia over and above what I have already given her.

      Item  I give unto my daughter Rachel McNut five shillings current money of the State of Virginia over and above what I have already given her.

      Item  I lend unto my loving wife Elizabeth Grigsby all my estate real and personal to have and to hold the same during her natural life in joint trust discharging debts and gifts or legacies as above in a reasonable time, and that she my said wife in joint trust with chosen Executors herein mentioned do act discretionary with my younger sons and daughters in manner following:

      That Martha, Elizabeth and Franky shall have at age or marriage equal to their sisters Jane Paxton and Rachel McNut including all they received at marriage and my sons Joseph, Elisha and Reuben to have the plantation whereon I now live divided equally amongst them by any three or more neighbors whom they shall appoint and at the decease of my wife the remainder shall be divided equally among my sons and daughters, viz: Joseph, Jane, Rachel, Martha, Elisha, Elizabeth, Franky and

Reuben having no respect in the division to such sum as shall be given to any of them either at age or marriage and further it is my will that if any of my last named sons and daughters should die intestate his, her, or their share of the estate as above mentioned shall be equally divided among the survivor or survivors.

      Lastly, I appoint and nominate my beloved wife Elizabeth Grigsby Executrix and Joseph Grigsby Executor of this my last will and testament hereby making nul and void any will or wills heretofore made by me acknowledging this my last will and testament.

      In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eleventh day of May, Domini one thousand seven hundred and ninety two.

 

      Signed, sealed and acknowledged     His   in the presence of:   John X Grigsby (seal)      John Paxton       Robert Snodgrass          mark  His  William X Arnold   

 David Willock   Mark         A Copy Teste: Harry B. Wright,Clerk                           

From a book written by Henrietta Hamilton:

 

In the 1740, John accompanied Lawrence Washington, in the forces of Admiral Vernon, on the expedition against Cartagena, South America, which was "one of the most important event of Gooch's Administration, as taken in connection with the other colonies, it was another step in the development of Union." See, "History of Augusta County", J. Lewis Peyton; and "Collections of the Virginia Historical Society," Volume IX.

Afterward he commanded a company in the thirteenth Regiment of the

Virginia Line during the Revolutionary War. This information was obtained from the old war records in the archives at Washington. Owing to participation in this Colonial War and in the Revolutionary War, he was afterward known as Soldier John.

More About John Grigsby:

Military service: In the Colonial War was one of Augustine Washington's Co. at the Siege of Carthagene.  In the Revolution 13th Regiment Virginia Culpepper Virginia Minutemen

More About John Grigsby and Rosanna Etchinson:

Marriage: 1746, Culpepper Co., VA

     

Children of John Grigsby and Rosanna Etchinson are:

       18           i.      John Jr. Grigsby, born 15 Oct 1752 in Culpepper Co. VIrginia; died 28 Sep 1826 in Hawkins, TN; married Winifred Elizabeth Breeden 06 Apr 1778.

                     ii.      James Grigsby, born 10 Nov 1748 in Culpepper Co. , VA.

                    iii.      Charles Grigsby, born 06 Apr 1755 in Culpepper Co. , VA; died Abt. 1816 in Rockbridge Co., VA.

                    iv.      Sally Grigsby, born 1757 in VA.; died 1821.

                     v.      Sarah Grigsby, born 30 Dec 1757 in Culpepper Co. , VA.

                    vi.      William Grigsby, born 06 Dec 1761 in Culpepper Co. , VA; died 1830 in VA.

 

      38.  John Breeden (Source: (1) Breeding / Grigsby Family Bible., (2) http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jvoyles/alliedkiserfamilies/bryantbreedinggen1and2.htm..), born 04 Oct 1730; died 01 May 1802 in Breeding Cemetery at Artrip Russell Co, Va.  He was the son of 76. John Breeden and 77. Elizabeth Conway.  He married 39. Winnifred Elizabeth Ashby 01 May 1749.

      39.  Winnifred Elizabeth Ashby, born 03 Jan 1731; died 09 Sep.

Notes for John Breeden:

The following  by Steve Behr, 413 Lebanon, San Antonio, TX 78233

 "On 20 Sep 1773, George Cutlip and wife Susannah of Dunmore (later Shenandoah) County, Virginia, conveyed 120 acres of land lying south of the Shenandoah river to John Breeding of Augusta County for 46 pounds."

 "1774 Washington County Clerk’s office, John Breden proved to the court that they, Samuel Vanhook and John Breden were entitled to 400 acres of land lying on the Clinch River at the south of Weaver’s Creek, and on both sides of the river to include their improvements made in the year 1775. In 1781 Samuel Vanhook assigned his part of the 400 acres to John Breden."

"1776 Rockingham County, Chalkey; dry Run of Hawskbill Creek corner of Bryan Breeding."

 "1783 Rockingham abstracts by Edward Franklin, assignee of William Vatters, 159 acres, Shenandoah River, adjoining John Breden, Apr 8.  It is surveyed on the same day as Joseph Lowdabeck’s 168 acres between Peaked Mountain and Shenandoah River adjoining John Fulch."

 "20 Aug 1783 - Washington County Court Proceedings Ordered that John Breeding be Constable in Captain Cowans company (Washington County)."  Page 1159, "annals of Southwest Virginia" by Lewis Preston Summers and transcribed by Lane Alexander.  This could also be his son, John Jr. who fought in the Revolutionary War and later moved his family first to Adair County, KY and then finally to Missouri.

 "1784  Rockingham County, Virginia, page 358, Minutes Book, August 23, Deeds of Release from John Breeding, Sr., to John Breeding, Jr., proved by oath of John Grigsby (who later became his son-in-law by marrying his daughter Winnifred)."

 In 1785 a petition was drawn up and signed to make Russell County, Virginia from a portion of Washington County, Va.  The Breedings are later recorded as living in Russell County, Va.

 Per Barbara Breeding:  (Mrs. George Breeding, 549 Knaust Road, Saint Peters, MO 63376)

 "John was evidently an Indian Spy, which in those days was a member of the Army of Militia who ranged far ahead of the regular forces.  He watched for Indians making raids or attacking the settlers.  John lived in Rockingham County (formed from Augusta County in 1778) but he scouted out along the frontier.  His son, John Breeding, Jr. was also a spy.  This is quite likely how they found the land they liked along the Clinch and made improvements in it and filed a claim.  John had made a claim which means he made improvements before 1778, the cut off date for Settlement rights.  He also received two other land grants adjoining his Settlement right, which he paid for. One grant was for 100 acres and another for 300. A party of Cherokee visited the lower Holston in June, 1788.  they wounded one man and carried away about 100 horses.  Three of the Breedings from the New Garden Settlement in Russell County were found on Black Mountain, killed and scalped.  There were probably a son and grandsons of John."

======================================

 The following information is from David Dollard:

 BREEDINGS KILLED BY INDIANS IN RUSSELL CO., VA

 Thomas Carter, Henry Dickenson, and David Cowan of Russell County, Virginia, wrote Governor Edmund Randolph on June 24, 1788, the following letter:

 "Laying before the Executive Council an account of Indian depredations upon the counties they represent.  They have reliable information that the savages have lately killed 16 persons on the French Broad, and that the news has reached them of 80 Indians being on their way against the Holston and Clinch.

 "That 4 men had been killed in their county (Russell) and the Cherokee had joined the Creeks, which combination no force the people could raise to resist.  Three men had been killed on the Black Mountain and David Campbell and his family, and Hugh Berry and his family, particular acquaintances of theirs, had also been killed and the station on French Broad with many horses from Powell Valley had been captured.  Although some of these depredations were not in their immediate neighborhood, nor even in this state, yet, from the enterprising character of these savages, their operations were never confined to localities or even states.  They, therefore, considering their part of the country in great danger, and especially as Russell County is the barrier to Washington and Montgomery , beg that scouts and a force of Rangers be authorized to go out from these two counties to act in concert with the few men who can be raised in Russell.  This latter county has a frontier of 150 miles in advance of Washington andMontgomery, and on account of the scattered condition of the inhabitants they are obliged to live in forts, totally to the neglect of their crops, etc.  By the enclosed letter they hear that Colonel Joseph Martin is a prisoner with the Cherokees and may not get out of their hands in safety.  That men who had gone to the Black Mountain to dig ginseng had found a camp who one of the Elimes (Elams) and three of the Breedings of New Garden and Neal Roberts, had been about the same employment, several of whom lay killed and scalped.  The Cherokees evidently been at war and unless means are taken at once to protect that county, great suffering and disaster must follow soon.  "If this letter to Governor Randolph seems hard to read and comprehend , remember it was written in 1788 and not in the way we know Modern English today".

 "The Neal Roberts, who was killed, was Cornelius Roberts, who lived in the Glade Hollow section of Russell County, and owned 352 acres of land, which was surveyed and entered in Washington County on January 14, 1783.  After his death, his widow, Mary, supposedly married Rev. John Frost, a Baptist minister, who lived on the fork of Holston River, just below the mouth of Greendale Creek, called Harrold's Creek in Revolution ary times. It will be noted that when Captain Isaac Newland's family was captured by Indians in 1789, the attack was made on the "Frost Settlement."  An Edward Frost was married by the Rev. John Frost to Amilla Roberts on October 3, 1791, who may have been closely related to Cornelius Roberts.

 "It is hard to determine who was killed in the Elams and Breeding families at the ginseng camp, as no first names are given.  In the early records, only one reference to an Elam is found, and that was in Washington County court orders for May 19,1784, William Elam was paid a bounty for a wolf's head.

 "The three Breedings who were killed are also unknown as to first names, there was a Richard and John Breeding who were on the Illinois campaign of George Rogers Clark in 1777, a John Breeding owned some 800 acres of land on both sides of the Clinch river in the New Garden section of Russell County Virginia which are confusing on June 23, 1785, John Breeding married Elizabeth Napier.  The officiating Minister was Rev. Simon Cockrell, and on July 6, 1785, John Breeding married, Elizabeth Napper, with the officiating Minister being the Rev. John Frost.  It could be that one of these is the marriage bond, and the other the marriage date, and both are the same person.

 "The location of the slaying of these people is established in a general area, the Black Mountains, being that range of high mountains lying back of Appalachia, Virginia, on the Kentucky-Virginia border.  The Cornelius Roberts, who was slain left at least one son, named Archibald Roberts

 "Louis Preston Summers says in his History of Southwest Virginia that a party of Cherokees visited the lower Holston in June 1788.  They wounded one man and carried away about one hundred horses.  Three Breedings from the New Garden settlement in Russell County were found on Black Mountain, killed and scalped.  Herbert Lancing Breeding, a descendent of George Breeding, from Memphis Tennessee, had done a great deal of research on the Breedings.  He believes the three Breedings may have been a son and grandson of John Breden, Sr.  "This John BREEDING Sr mention here is Spencer's father."  ** End of Article **

===================================

 I.  JOHN BREDIN, later known as BREDEN, BREEDEN, and finally JOHN BREEDING, SR., was born about 1725.  He was apparently living with his father’s family until, after filing for land in Augusta County, he was awarded a grant on Pass Run, a tributary of Hawskbill Creek, on the same day, and in the same area as the one obtained by his father.  This was in 1749.  He was married and began a family of his own.

 John purchased 120 acres lying south of the Shenandoah River, in the present Rockingham County, on September 20, 1773.

 He is said to have been an Indian spy for the Army or Militia.  In this capacity, he ranged far in advance of the regular forces, watching for Indians who appeared to be preparing raids or attacks on settlers.  Although he lived in Rockingham County, he scouted on the frontier, and while so occupied along Clinch River, learned that land there was being opened for settlement.

 About 1774, he went to that area, which in 1776 became Washington County, now Russell.  The Washington County land-grant book states that in 1775, John Breden and Sauer Vanhook proved to the Court that they were entitled to a 400 acre Settlement Tract on both sides of Clinch River at the mouth of Weavers Creek.  In order to make that claim, “improvements” had to be made, which almost certainly would have meant the clearing of some ground.  In 1781, Samuel Vanhook assigned his part of the claim to John Breden, who not only received the 400 acres, but also grants of 300 and 100 acres, adjoining, and also on both sides of the Clinch.

 A part of John’s family joined him in Washington County by 1782.  In that year he and his son Spencer paid a personal tax.  The family was busy building shelter, starting with a huge kitchen, in which they all lived for at least two years while their house was under construction.

 Wishing to settle land on his children, he proposed to divide his 400 acre Settlement Tract be-tween his son Spencer and his grandson John, son of Bryant, who had died - or was killed - during the Revolution.  In 1792 the property was assigned to Spencer, on the condition that he give John his half when the young man was of age.  Then a few days later, John, Sr. assigned his 100 acre Settlement Tract to John, Jr.

 When, however, John the son of Bryant became 21, Spencer refused to share the property.  John Breeding, Sr., and his grandson then sued Spencer for it.  This was in 1799 or 1800.  The court awarded for the plaintiffs.

 John, Sr., who had built a house and was living on the north side of Clinch River on the land meant for young John, then deeded it to him, but continued to live there until his death, about 1801.  Nothing is known of his wife or wives, except that he was survived by a widow, possibly Nancy.

 John Breeding, Sr. had made numerous land investments during the previous 20 years, and at his death (1801/1802) owned a considerable acreage including a number of tracts occupied by his descendants.  Also there was a group of at least seven parcels totaling 630 acres, eventually sold by the county in 1815 and 1816 for unpaid taxes.

 

The following  by Steve Behr

 

On 20 Sep 1773, George Cutlip and wife Susannah of Dunmore (later Shenandoah) County, Virginia, conveyed 120 acres of land lying south of the Shenandoah river to John Breeding of Augusta County for 46 pounds.”

 

“1774 Washington County Clerk’s office, John Breden proved to the court that they, Samuel Vanhook and John Breden were entitled to 400 acres of land lying on the Clinch River at the south of Weaver’s Creek, and on both sides of the river to include their improvements made in the year 1775. In 1781 Samuel Vanhook assigned his part of the 400 acres to John Breden.”

 

“1783 Rockingham abstracts by Edward Franklin, assignee of William Vatters, 159 acres, Shenandoah River, adjoining John Breden, Apr 8. It is surveyed on the same day as Joseph Lowdabeck’s 168 acres between Peaked Mountain and Shenandoah River adjoining John Fulch.”

 

“1784 Rockingham County, Virginia, page 358, Minutes Book, August 23, Deeds of Release from John Breeding, Sr., to John Breeding, Jr., proved by oath of John Grigsby (who later became his son-in-law by marrying Winnifred).”

 

BY Barbara Breeding: (Mrs. George Breeding, 549 Knaust Road, Saint Peters, MO 63376):

“John was evidently an Indian Spy, which in those days was a member of the Army of Militia who ranged far ahead of the regular forces. He watched for Indians making raids or attaching the settlers. John lived in Rockingham County (formed from Augusta County in 1778) but he scouted out along the frontier. His son, John Breeding, Sr., was also a spy. This is quite likely how they found the land they liked along the Clinch and made improvments in it and filed a claim. John had made a claim which means he made improvements before 1778, the cut off date for Settlement rights. He also received two other land grants adjoining his Settlement right, which he paid for. One grant was for 100 acres and another for 300. A party of Cherokee visited the lower Holston in June, 1788. They wounded one man and carried away about 100 horses. Three of the Breedings from the New Garden Settlement in Russell County were found on Black Mountain, killed and scalped. They were probably a son and grandsons of John.”

 

The following information from David Dollard:

BREEDINGS KILLED BY INDIANS IN RUSSELL CO., VA

 

Thomas Carter, Henry Dickenson, and David Cowan of Russell County, Virginia, wrote Governor Edmund Randolph on June 24, 1788, the following letter:

 

"Laying before the Executive Council an account of Indian depredations upon the counties they represent. They have reliable information that the savages have lately killed 16 persons on the French Broad, and that the news has reached them of 80 Indians being on their way against the Holston and Clinch.

 

That 4 men had been killed in their county (Russell) and the Cherokee had joined the Creeks, which combination no force the people could raise to resist. Three men had been killed on the Black Mountain and David Campbell and his family, and Hugh Berry and his family, particular acquaintances of theirs, had also been killed and the station on French Broad with many horses from Powell Valley had been captured. Although some of these depredations were not in their immediate neighborhood, nor even in this state, yet, from the enterprising character of these savages, their operations were never confined to localities or even states. They, therefore, considering their part of the country in great danger, and especially as Russell County is the barrier to Washington and Montgomery , beg that scouts and a force of Rangers be authorized to go out from these two counties to act in concert with the few men who can be raised in Russell. This latter county has a frontier of 150 miles in advance of Washington and Montgomery, and on account of the scattered condition of the inhabitants they are obliged to live in forts, totally to the neglect of their crops, etc. By the enclosed letter they hear that Colonel Joseph Martin is a prisoner with the Cherokees and may not get out of their hands in safety. That men who had gone to the Black Mountain to dig ginseng had found a camp who one of the Elimes (Elams) and three of the Breedings of New Garden and Neal Roberts, had been about the same employment, several of whom lay killed and scalped. The Cherokees evidently been at war and unless means are taken at once to protect that county, great suffering and disaster must follow soon”. If this letter to Governor Randolph seems hard to read and comprehend , remember it was written in 1788 and not in the way we know Modern English today.

 

The Neal Roberts, who was killed, was Cornelius Roberts, who lived in the Glade Hollow section of Russell County, and owned 352 acres of land, which was surveyed and entered in Washington County on January 14, 1783. After his death, his widow, Mary, supposedly married Rev. John Frost, a Baptist minister, who lived on the fork of Holston River, just below the mouth of Greendale Creek, called Harrold's Creek in Revolution ary times. It will be noted that when Captain Isaac Newland's family was captured by Indians in 1789, the attack was made on the "Frost Settlement." An Edward Frost was married by the Rev. John Frost to Amilla Roberts on October 3, 1791, who may have been closely related to Cornelius Roberts.

 

It is hard to determine who was killed in the Elams and Breeding families at the ginseng camp, as no first names are given. In the early records, only one reference to an Elam is found, and that was in Washington County court orders for May 19,1784, William Elam was paid a bounty for a wolf's head.

The three Breedings who were killed are also unknown as to first names, there was a Richard and John Breeding who were on the Illinois campaign of George Rogers Clark in 1777. It is felt that it was Richard Breeding who was killed as John, his brother, eventually moved to KY and then finally to MO. All of the rest of John Breeding Sr.’s sons are accounted for.

 

The location of the slaying of these people is established in a general area, the Black Mountains, being that range of high mountains lying back of Appalachia, Virginia, on the Kentucky-Virginia border. The Cornelius Roberts, who was slain left at least one son, named Archibald Roberts

 

Louis Preston Summers says in his History of Southwest Virginia that a party of Cherokees visited the lower Holston in June 1788. They wounded one man and carried way about one hundred horses. Three Breedings from the New Garden settlement s in Russell County were found on Black Mountain, killed and scalped. Herbert Lancing Breeding, a descendent of George Breeding, from Memphis Tennessee, had done a great deal of research on the Breedings. He believes the three Breedings may have been a son and grandson of John Breden, Sr. ** End of Dave Dollard’s information **

 

In 1792, John Breeding Sr. gave his son, Spencer, his settlement rights to the 400 acres provided he deed half of it to his grandson, John Breeding, III, son of Bryant Breeding, when the boy became 21. Bryant, John’s oldest son had been killed in the Revolutionary War. When John III reached 21, Spencer refused to give the land and the two John’s sued Spencer for half the land. The court gave it to them. John Sr. made a deed to his grandson John III, in which he referred to him as John, Jr., (probably since his own son, John Jr. had already left Virginia, having moved to Kentucky.) giving him the land at his death. Upset by this Spencer sued his father for $5.

 

At a court held for Russell County, Virginia, 23 Nov 1802, it was ordered on the motion of Spencer Breeding that a summons be issued against ... Breeding, widow and relict of John Breeding, Sr., deceased to show cause why she did not come forward and administer on the estate of John and the sheriff was ordered to take possession and proceed as the law directed until an administrator was appointed.

 

Copied from hand written bible pages, transcribed by Barbara Breeding,  and typed by Julie Voyles. Below entries taken from left and right hand side pages which when opened, faced each other.

 

Left hand side of page which faces right hand side of page (see below for right hand side)

 

John Breeding, born 25 Sep 1711

John Breeding born 4 Oct 1730

Winfred Eliza Ashby born 3 Jan 1731

James Breeding born 16 Nov 1750

John Breeding born 8 May 1752

Winfred Elizab Breeding born 27 Aug 1757

Spencer R. Breeding born 1 May 1759

John Breeding died 1 May __________

Winfred E. Breeding died 9 Sept _________

 

Right hand side of page which faces left hand side of page (see above for left hand side)

 

John Grigsby

 

John Breeding  mari Winfred Ashby 1 May 1749

 

Winfred E. Breeding  Mar John Grigsby 6 Apr 1778

 

John Breeding  Marri Mary Short 4 Sep 17_ (could also be 4 Sep 18__, paper is creased and date is not legible)

 

Spencer Breeding  M. Elizabeth Finney 5 Aug 1786

 

JOHN BREDIN, later known as BREDEN, BREEDEN, and finally JOHN BREEDING, SR., was born about 1725. He was apparently living with his father's family until, after filing for land in Augusta County, he was awarded a grant on Pass Run, a tributary of Hawskbill Creek, on the same day, and in the same area as the one obtained by his father. This was in 1749. He was married and began a family of his own.

 

John purchased 120 acres lying south of the Shenandoah River, in the present Rockingham County, on September 20, 1773.

 

He is said to have been an Indian spy for the Army or Militia. In this capacity, he ranged far in advance of the regular forces, watching for Indians who appeared to be preparing raids or attacks on settlers. Although he lived in Rockingham County, he scouted on the frontier, and while so occupied along Clinch River, learned that land there was being opened for settlement.

 

About 1774, he went to that area, which in 1776 became Washington County, now Russell. The Washington County land-grant book states that in 1775, John Breden and Sauer Vanhook proved to the Court that they were entitled to a 400 acre Settlement Tract on both sides of Clinch River at the mouth of Weavers Creek. In order to make that claim, "improvements" had to be made, which almost certainly would have meant the clearing of some ground. In 1781, Samuel Vanhook assigned his part of the claim to John Breden, who not only received the 400 acres, but also grants of 300 and 100 acres, adjoining, and also on both sides of the Clinch.

 

A part of John's family joined him in Washington County by 1782. In that year he and his son Spencer paid a personal tax. The family was busy building shelter, starting with a huge kitchen, in which they all lived for at least two years while their house was under construction.

 

Wishing to settle land on his children, he proposed to divide his 400 acre Settlement Tract be-tween his son Spencer and his grandson John, son of Bryant, who had died - or was killed - during the Revolution. In 1792 the property was assigned to Spencer, on the condition that he give John his half when the young man was of age. Then a few days later, John, Sr. assigned his 100 acre Settlement Tract to John, Jr.

 

When, however, John the son of Bryant became 21, Spencer refused to share the property. John Breeding, Sr., and his grandson then sued Spencer for it. This was in 1799 or 1800. The court awarded for the plaintiffs

 

John, Sr., who had built a house and was living on the north side of Clinch River on the land meant for young John, then deeded it to him, but continued to live there until his death, about 1801. Nothing is known of his wife or wives, except that he was survived by a widow, possibly Nancy.

 

John Breeding, Sr. had made numerous land investments during the previous 20 years, and at his death (1801/1802) owned a considerable acreage including a number of tracts occupied by his descendants. Also there was a group of at least seven parcels totaling 630 acres, eventually sold by the county in 1815 and 1816 for unpaid taxes.

 

More About John Breeden: Burial: Breeding Cemetery at Artrip

 

More About John Breeden and Winnifred Ashby: Marriage: 01 May 1749

     

Children of John Breeden and Winnifred Ashby are:

       19           i.      Winifred Elizabeth Breeden, born 27 Aug 1757 in VA.; died 1830 in Hawkins, TN; married John Jr. Grigsby 06 Apr 1778.

                     ii.      Bryant Breeding, born Abt. 1750 in Augusta Co., VA; died 16 Aug 1824 in MO.

                    iii.      John Breeding, Jr, born 08 May 1752.

                    iv.      Spencer R. Breeding

v.                  James Breeden, born 16 Nov 1754.

vi.                 

      40.  John Pointer, born 14 Aug 1719 in Bitteswell, Leic, England; died Unknown in KY.  He was the son of 80. Joesph Pointer and 81. Dorothy Orton.

     

Child of John Pointer is:

       20           i.      George Pointer, born Abt. 1750 in Ky or VI; married Betsea Unknown.

 

      52.  James Dillard (Source: (1) Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army, Fifteenth Virginia  page 197., (2) Revolutionary War Records Virginia Section II (4), Document No. 30-List No. 1)., (3) Revolutionary War Records Virginia Section III, (21) Virigina Military Land Warrants., (4) Family History   Author: Lucy Henderson Horton  Call Number: R929.1H82   Press of the News, Tennessee 1922, page 55.), died 04 Dec 1836.  He was the son of 104. Thomas Dillard Sr. and 105. Winifred Nalle.  He married 53. Sarah Ann Post.

      53.  Sarah Ann Post

 

Notes for James Dillard:

Alphabetical List of Officers of the Continental Army D Fifteenth Virginia

page 197

Dillard, James (Va). 2d Lieutenant 10th Virginia, 3d February, 1777; 1st Lieutenant, 2d January, 1778; resigned 30th May, 1778; Captain Virginia Militia at King's Mountain, October, 1780, and in South Carolina in 1781. (Died 4th December, 1836.)

 

Revolutionary War Records VIRGINIA Section II (4), [Document No. 30--List No. I]

Dillard, James   Captain   Cont'l.   4000   Feb. 5, 1810   3 years

 

Revolutionary War Records VIRGINIA SECTION III (21) Virginia Military Land Warrants

5797-800   Dillard, James (Thomas Norvell, assnee. of William Armistead, attor. in fast for James Dillard)   Capt.   3 years

 

Family History  Author: Lucy Henderson Horton Call Number: R929.1H82

This book contains the family history of the Hughes, Dalton, Martin, Henderson families of Virginia.

 

Bibliographic Information: Horton, Lucy Henderson. Family History. Press of the News. Tennessee 1922.   pg 55

The Dillard family were originally Church of England people. On page 15, Vol. II, Old Churches and Families of Virginia, by Bishop Meade, it can be seen that Thomas Dillard was vestryman of Camden parish, Pittsylvania county, Va. This same family took part in Colonial wars (see page 84, Gleanings of Virginia, and Henning's Statutes).

 

Mr. John Lea Dillard of Portsmouth and Columbus, Ohio, has in his posession a record from Williamsburg, Va., showing that Capt. James Dillard was allowed so much money for paying off his troops after an Indian campaign. This, of course, was in colonial days. He also has a dictionary which belonged to the same Captain, later Major, Jas. Dillard; and some of his writings dated 1703. The penmanship is fine.

 

Captain, later Major, James Dillard, served his country in the French and Indian war. He went out to this war from Halifax county. This county joins Pittsylvania. Captain James Dillard was paid for his services during the French and Indian war (see page 84. Gleanings of Virginia, and Henning's Statutes.)

 

The French and Indian war, which lasted from 1754 to 1763, was the American phase of the Seven Years' war, and the culminating portion of the struggle between France and England for the possession of North America.

     

Children of James Dillard and Sarah Post are:

       26           i.      Thomas Dillard, died 1820 in Patrick Co., VA; married Ruth Goad.

                     ii.      John Dillard

                    iii.      Geoge Dillard

                    iv.      Joseph Dillard

 

 

      54.  Abraham Goad, born 10 Mar 1709 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va; died 21 Sep 1779 in Pittsylvania Co., VA.  He was the son of 108. Abraham Goad and 109. Katherine Williams.  He married 55. Joanna Wheatley Abt. 1730 in Prince William Co., VA.

      55.  Joanna Wheatley, born Unknown; died Unknown.

 

Notes for ABRAHAM GOAD:

DAR Patriot Index Centennial Edition." It was published in 1990. "Centennial" refers to the DAR 100th anniversary of its founding.  Abraham Goad: b 3-15-1710 VA d a 9-21-1779 VA m Joanna --- PS VA (DAR Patriot Index)

 

Following information from WFT Vol. 10, Tree 1569, Carol Y. Mittag,

Abraham and Abraham Goad, Junr. are included on "A list of persons sworn to the State in Capt. McCorkle's Company of Montgomery County by Stephen Trigg in 1777". (Source: "Early Adventures on the Western Waters, Vol 1", by Mary B. Kegley.) This source also shows Abraham Goad included on a list of survey made for almost 1,000 early adventurer on the Western Waters under the terms of the Loyal Land Company. Abraham was also shown on a list of delinquents returned by Daniel Trigg Deputy Sheriff for th Year 1773 and on a list of delinquents returned by James McGavock for 1773.

 

Abraham received a grant of 374 acres on Frying Pan Creek, adjoining Dalton. Two of his grandsons, sons of Robert would later marry Dalton sisters.

 

 Will of Abraham Goad, September 21, 1779

Pittsylvania County, Virginia - Abstacts of Wills 1768 - 1800,  compiled and indexed by Thomas P. Hughes, Jr. and Jewel B Standefer, 1974, page 34

oad, Abraham                                                 D&W 5, p 451

Not dated                                                          Pr: Sept. 21, 1779

 Names: 

 Daus:  Sarah Goad, Mary Shane, Hannah Burdit, Elizabeth Collier and qives them 1 shillinq each

Son: William Goad

Daus: Judith Hollay (Holley) and Ruth Dillard

Son:  Abraham Goad- the cow I lent him and half of my land

Son:  Robert Goad- one half of land and all the rest of my personal estate.

Line of land division between Abraham and Robert to run parallel with him next to Frying Pan Creek and son, Robert, to have first choice.  If either of them die without heirs, tho other to have land 

 Executor:  Son, Robert Goad Witnesses:  George Phillips, William Goad, Sr., John Goad, Sr.s/Abraham Goad

Will exhibited by Robert Goad, Ex’rProved by oaths of witnesses and O. R.

 

GOAD, ABRAHAM D&W 5, P 451 

From Abstracts of Pittsylvania Co. Va. Wills--1767-1820, Lela Adams, Compiler; Southern Historical Press 1986

 

ABRAHAM GOAD

13 July 1779     

Pr: 21 September 1779

 

To my daughter SARAH GOAD one shilling.

To my daughter HANNAH BURDET one shilling.

To my daughter ELIZABETH COLLIER one shilling.

To my daughter JUDITH HOLLAY one shilling.

To my son WILLIAM GOAD one shilling.

To my daughter RUTH DILLARD one shilling.

 

To my son ABRAHAM GOAD the cow I lent him, and half my land on Frying Pan

Creek.

 

To my son ROBERT GOAD one half of my land and all the remaining part of my

personal estate. Should either of these die without issue, then to his brother.

 

Appoint son ROBERT GOAD executor.

ABRAHAM (X) GOAD

 

Wit: GEORGE PHILLIPS, WILLIAM GOAD, SR., JOHN GOAD, SR.

GEORGE PHILLIPS and BENJAMIN TARRANT security for executor.

 

From Smith, Janice Kinsler, "Goad and Webb Family of Southwest Virginia, With Allied Families, Vol II, Goad Family", 1994 Revision, p. 413 (quoting Alderman, The settlements, p. 413):

      "eventually settled in Pittsylvania County and is referred to today by those who research the family as 'Pittsylvania Ab.' There is some reason to believe that he lived for a time in Prince William County after he left Richmond County and before he settle in Pittsylvania.... The will does not mention his wife Joannah, so it is assumed that she predeceased him; it does list nine children, all of whom were bequethed one shilling, excepting Robert and Abraham who were devised the land."

 

More About ABRAHAM GOAD:

Probate: September 21, 1779, Pittsylvania County, Virginia41

     

Abraham Goad of Pittsylvania County, Virginia  p.10.

His father left him a tract of land but there is no record in the deed indices of his selling it.  His wife, named Joanna, appeared in the parish register in recording the birth of their eldest child.  Abraham sold his other land to his brother, Peter and probably left Richmond County after the birth of the first child in 1736. He was probably in Pittsylvania County, VA, when the county was formed in 1767.  He appears in the order books of the county as early as 1769. Abraham wrote his will (signing it by the mark "A") on July 13, 1779 and it was proved September 21, 1779 and probated in Deed Book 5, page 451. He left his daughters one shilling each and his son, William, one shilling. His land he devised to his sons, Robert and Abraham.  His wife, Joannah, is not mentioned in the will so it is presumed that she predeceased him. Land grant records at the Virginia State Library in Richmond record that in 1769, Abraham Goad of Pittsylvania County received a grant of 374 acres on Frying Pan Creek, adjoining Dalton.  Two of his grandsons, sons of Robert, would later marry Dalton sisters. Other than the above, almost nothing of the life of this Abraham Goad is known. Without the wills of Abraham, John and their father, we would know

little about the Goad family prior to 1780. Abraham is referred to today by those who research the family as "Pittsylvania Abe."  There is some reason to believe that he lived for a time in Price William Coiunty after he left Richmond County and before he settled in Pittsylvania.  The will does not mention his wife Joannah, so it is assumed that she had predeceased him; it does list nine children, all of whom were bequeathed one shilling, excepting Robert and Abraham who were devised the land.

 

More About Abraham Goad and Joanna Wheatley:

Marriage: Abt. 1730, Prince William Co., VA

     

Children of Abraham Goad and Joanna Wheatley are:

       27           i.      Ruth Goad, born Abt. 1750 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died Aft. 1821 in Patrick Co., VA; married Thomas Dillard.

                     ii.      Joshua Goad, born Aft. 1730; died 31 Oct 1776.

                    iii.      Judith Goad, born Aft. 1730 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died Unknown.

                    iv.      William Goad, born Aft. 1730 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died 1830 in Rhea Co,. TN.

                     v.      Abraham Goad, born 1735 in Pittsylvania Co., VA; died 1779.

                    vi.      Hannah Goad, born Aft. 1736; died Aft. 1765; married Unknown Burdett.

                   vii.      Sarah Goad, born 07 Apr 1736 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co., Va; died Unknown.

                  viii.      Mary Goad, born Abt. 1738; died Unknown; married Unknown Shaw.

                    ix.      Robert Goad, born 1750 in Halifax Co., VA; died Mar 1836 in Grayson Co., VA.

                     x.      Elizabeth Goad, born Abt. 1755 in Lee Co., VA; died Unknown.

 

      56.  Richard Burgess, born 1724 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died 1792 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.  He was the son of 112. Samuel Chew Burgess and 113. Elizabeth Fowler Durbin.  He married 57. Mary Ursula.

      57.  Mary Ursula, born 11 Dec 1724 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died 1792 in Anne Arundel Co., MD.

 

Notes for Richard Burgess:

26. RICHARD5 BURGESS (SAMUEL4, EDWARD3, WILLIAM2, DANIEL1) was born Abt. 1735 in South River Hundred,

Anne Arundel County , Md. He married MARY Abt. 1757. She was born Abt. 1737.

 

More About RICHARD BURGESS:

Plantations: "Burgess Right' and "Puddington Harbour" "Cheyney's hazard"

     

Children of RICHARD BURGESS and MARY are:

 

             1 SAMUEL6 BURGESS, b. September 10, 1758

             2  ANNE BURGESS, b. June 30, 1760.

             3   RICHARD BURGESS, b. April 25, 1762.

             4 CHARLES BURGESS, b. February 26, 1764.

             5 ELIZABETH BURGESS, b. November 12, 1765.

             6   GEORGE BURGESS, b. June 12, 1767.

             7 SARAH BURGESS, b. November 05, 1769.

             8 MORDECAI BURGESS, b. November 05, 1769

             9 EDWARD BURGESS, b. July 14, 1771.

           10 MARY BURGESS, b. April 21, 1773.

       .

              

     

Children of Richard Burgess and Mary Ursula are:

       28           i.      Richard Jr. Burgess, born 25 Apr 1762 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown; married unknown.

                     ii.      Anne Burgess, born 1762 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                    iii.      Charles Burgess, born 1764 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                    iv.      Elizabeth Burgess, born 1765 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                     v.      George Burgess, born 1767 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                    vi.      Sarah Burgess, born 1769 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                   vii.      Mordecal Burgess, born 1769 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                  viii.      Edward Burgess, born 1771 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                    ix.      Mary Burgess, born 1773 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

                     x.      Samuel Burgess, born 1778 in Anne Arundel Co., MD; died Unknown.

 

 

      60.  William McBee (Source: (1) Abstracts of Norhtern Neck Warrants and Surveys.  Dunmore, Shenandoah, Culpepr, Prince William, Stafford, Fauuier Countries, Virginia 1710/1780, pgs 169, 95, 130. vol lll  by Peggy Shoma Joyner., (2) Out of the Wilderson by Janice Mercer., (3) Virginia Northern Neckland Grants, Vol II. 1742-1775 compiled by Gertrude E. Gray, pg 14., (4) Vardry Mcbee Man of Reason, by Roy McBee Smith., (5) "Will of William Mcbee," 20 August 1758, Will Book 0 (zero), page 55-57, Halifax County, Virginia, Transcribed from the LDS Microfilm #0031862.., (6) PineyWoods Chapter, No. 51 Texas Society Sons of the American Revolution.), born 22 Oct 1704 in Prince George MD; died Mar 1759 in Halifax VA.  He was the son of 120. Mathew McBee and 121. Jane Brock.  He married 61. Susannah Vardry Abt. 1725 in King George Co., VA..

      61.  Susannah Vardry, born Abt. 1708 in Prince George, Maryland; died Abt. 1759 in Halifax County, Virginia.  She was the daughter of 122. John Vardry.

 

Notes for William McBee:

The Will of William (McBee) Magbee

 

Halifax County, Virginia, Will Book "O" page 58. In the Name of God Amen. I, William Magbee, of the County of Halifax and Parish of Antrim, being in perfect health and full Cense and memory and Whereas I know that it is ordained for all men once to die I do hereby made and ordain this my last -- and testament (Vis.) first I bequeath my soul to Almighty God that gave it and also my body to be buried at the desiration of my friends:

Item.     I make and apppoint my beloved Wife Susannah Magbee and my son James Magbee and my son Mathias Magbee my hole Executors of this my last will and testament. Item. I give and bequeath to my son Vadry Magbee Two Hundred acres of land lying on boath sides of Bunches Creek it being the lower end of my upper survey of land on said creak to him and his heirs or assigns forever.

 

Item.   I give and bequeath unto my son James Magbee Two Hundred acres of land lying on both sides of the north Fork of Bunches Creek it being the upper and the same tract where I now dwell to him his heirs or assigns forever. after his mother deceases.

 

Item.   I give to my daughter, Elizabeth Howard one shilling only.

 

Item. I give to my daughter, Mary Austin one shilling only.

 

Item. I leave all the rest of my personal estate to be equally divided between my loving wife and my son Mathias Magbee.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twentieth day of August

one Thousand seven hundred and fifty-eight

Test. Richard Davis William (X) Magbee

mark

Henry Farmer

Christopher Snead

At a Court held for Halifax County the 10th day of March 1759 the within written last will and testament of William Magbee deceased was exibited in Court by Susanna Magbee relict and executrix and James Magbee one of the executors therein appointed Mathias Magbee and the other executor therein  appointed being under the age of twently one years and the same was proved by the oaths of Christopher Snead and Richard Davis two of the witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded, and the executrix and executor having taken the oath of executor by law prescribed and with Robert Walters and

Abraham Little their securities entered into and acknowledged bond on their motion certificate was granted them for obtaining a probate of said will in due form.

A Copy Teste: J.T. Lacy Clark Test. George   Currie C.H.C.           (signed)

 

This copy was made for May Wilson McBee, November 23, 1920. The above sent to her by the Clerk of the Halifax County, Virginia, J.H. Lacy. (I, Danny A. McBee, copied this last will and testament of William

(McBee) Magbee as it was written in the book, Out of the Wilderness, by Janice Mercer.)

==============================================================

In King George's County, Virginia, on April 28, 1730, William McBee acquired 259 acres by a deed from Thomas Riphley. For this land on the "Northern neck," as they called that long Virginia peninsula between the Potomac and Rappahannok Rivers, he paid two thousand pounds of "Good and merchantable tobacco in cask at the rolling house within this county ...." In order to have that deposit in the County before 1730. Twelve miles down the road from the farm William McBee acquired from Riphley, was the 150 acre farm of Augustine Washington in Westmoreland County, where George Washington was born two years after William's purchase.

===============================================================

Daniel Marr of King George County, 260 acres in King George County on Marr's Run adjacent John Bradford, John Marr, John Hopper, William McBee. January 25, 1717/1718.

===============================================================

1722/1723, 2 March. King George County, Virginia. William McBee received a grant of land consisting of 342 acres of land. The land was situated on both sides of Marrs Run, a ranch falling into the Great Marsh Run in the County of King George, Virginia and being in the Northern Neck of the State of Virginia.

===============================================================

1728, 10 June. King George County, Vriginia. William McBee of the Parish of Hanover in the County of King George, Planter, of the one part and Thomas Barnes of the Parish of Washington in the County of Westmoreland, Merchant, of the other part, witnesseth that the said William McBee...4 shillings of current money of VA...by Thomas Barnes...342 acres in the Parish of Hanover, County of King George ...Signed William (by his special mark) McBee, in the presence of Abraham Barnes, John Graham, William Greenway, Elizabeth

(X)

===============================================================

 At a court held for King George County...came William McBee and acknowledged this deed of lease to Thomas Barnes. [Note: This William McBee can be told from another William, by their special marks. This William (husband of Susannah) has a mark that looks like a B that has fallen on its face. The other William has a stylized M as his mark. They are both very distinctive].

 

1739, 29 September, King George County, Virginia. William McBee...of the one part and Emanuel Cumbee of the [same]...for and in consideration of five shillings of lawful money ...[lease]...of 200 acres of land,...one year...Signed William (his special mark) McBee, in the presence of James McDonnel (McDaniel), David (X) Blackburn.

 

The release of the above was signed by Susannah McBee also, with her special mark, which looks like a backward S, elongated to look almost like a question mark.

===============================================================

1729/1730. King George County, Virginia. "Thomas Stamps, assignee (in 1730) of William McBee of King George County for whom surveyed; 9 Feb 1729/30 - 4 Aug 1730; 631 acres not to entrench on Brent Town pat., on Walnut Br. of Cedar Run; adj. Thomas Jarman, Timothy Dorgan. Surveyor John Warner."

Quoted as it appears on page 169, Abstracts of Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys, Dunmore,

Shenandoah, Culpeper, Prince William, Stafford, Fauquier Counties, Virginia -

1710/1780, Vol. III, by Peggy Shomo Joyner.

 

1730/1731. Prince William County, Virginia. Another quote from the Joyner book, p. 95: "Mr. Richard Buckner of Caroline County, 12 October 1730 - 12 April 1731; 411 acres adj. William MacBee alias MocBoy, Joshua Butler, Mark Harding, Alexander Clements, Daniel Feagon (now Crump's), Mr. Falkner,

Joseph King. Surveyor John Warner."

===============================================================

1735, 12 December. Amelia County, Virginia. William McBee shows up in a court case.

George Robertson Clark vs. William McBee - attachment.

The Pltf. having made oath...Court of Prince George County, judgement is granted him for six pounds, two shillings and one penny and the Sheriff of this County having sold the said McBee estate for 8 pounds, 10 shillings, and 11 pence, it is ordered he pay the said Robertson 6 pounds, 2 shillings, and one penny.

 

Also: John Nash vs. William Mackbee - attachment. The Pltf. ...one pound, three shillings and six pence half-penny, judgement is granted for the same and it is ordered that the Sheriff pay the same out of the money belonging to said McBee estate if so much there be after Robertson's debt is discharged and

10 shillings to Robert Stoker for gathering said McBee's corn. [Note: Remember estate doesn'tnecessarily mean that William McBee is deceased. I'm wondering though who this William is. Is this the same William who married Susannah? Another William? William who married Susannah had a lot more wealth than this.]

 

The following is quoted as it appears on page 130, Abstracts of Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys, as mentioned previously: "Lazarus Taylor, no warrant, date from survey, 3 jan 1744 -17 April 1745; 149 acres on ...Marr's Run. A drawing on plat labeled Jacobs _______, adj. John Coppidge (now John

Eustace's), Daniel Feagin, John McBee, William McBee, the Chapel Road, John Crump, Joseph King. Chain carrier Alexander Clemments and William Winn. Surveyor James Genn." This was in Prince William County, Virginia. This survey is also shown on page 14, Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants,

Volume II, 1742-1775, compiled by Gertrude E. Gray, and is listed as dated 14 Feb 1746.

===============================================================

William McBee was granted 800 acres of land in Lunenburg County, Virginia in 1746, this later fell into Halifax County, Virginia.

 

1752, 7 April. Lunenburg County, Virginia. William McBee. This indenture made this 7th day of April...1752 between William Magbe of the County of Lunenburg...and Thomas Dickson of the same county...50 pounds money of Virginia...land on both sides of Midway River containing 200 acres

granted by patent to William Magbe...beginning at the said William Magbe's upper corner

on the south side of the above mentioned land...Signed by William and Susannah [both with their special mark] Magbe. Witnesses: William Douglas, Able A. (X) Lee, William A. (X) Ashton. Possession...granted 6 day of April 1757.

 

1753. November Court. Lunenbury County, Virginia. William MacBay is defendant, Godfrey and David Jones are plaintiffs, listed as surviving heirs of Thomas Jones. [Plaintiff] not gainsaying the issues of the petition's demand and appearing to be just for the sum of 3 pounds, 6 shillings, and 1 pence current money, therefore it is considered by the court that the said plaintiff recover against the defendant...

 

More About William McBee and Susannah Vardry:

Marriage: Abt. 1725, King George Co., VA.

     

Children of William McBee and Susannah Vardry are:

       30           i.      Vardry McBee, born 23 Dec 1734 in Bristol Parish,VA; died 1805 in Christian Co., KY; married Hannah Echols Dec 1758 in Bristol Parrish, Dinwiddie Co., VA.

                     ii.      Johannah McBee, born Abt. 1733 in King George, VA; died 1790 in Frankline Co. GA; married Robert Walters; born Unknown; died Unknown.

                    iii.      Samuel McBee, born Unknown; died 1812 in Rhea Co. TN.

                    iv.      Elizabeth McBee, born Abt. 1732.

                     v.      Mathew McBee, born Abt. 1738 in Halifax VA; died Unknown.

                    vi.      James McBee, born Abt. 1739 in VA; died 1814 in GA.

                   vii.      Mathias McBee, born Abt. 1742; died Unknown in TN.

                  viii.      Gannum McBee, born Abt. 1745; died Abt. 1812.

                    ix.      William McBee, born Abt. 1735 in VA; died 1812 in Rhea Co. TN; married Abigail Hubbard.

 

      62.  William Echols (Source: Will of William Echols (Halifax County, Virgnia, written 8 Apr. 1771, proved 16 May 1771. Will Book No. 0, 1753-1772 (Reel 36) p. 310-311.).), born 1699 in :probably in King and Queen Co., VA; died Apr 1771 in Halifax Co., VA.  He was the son of 124. John Echols and 125. Mary Cave.  He married 63. Sarah Turner Abt. 1710.

      63.  Sarah Turner (Source: Will of William Echols (Halifax County, Virgnia, written 8 Apr. 1771, proved 16 May 1771. Will Book No. 0, 1753-1772 (Reel 36) p. 310-311.).), born Abt. 1690; died Feb 1778 in Halifax County, Virginia.

 

Notes for William Echols:

Will of William Echols, (Halifax County, Virgnia, written 8 Apr. 1771, proved 16 May 1771. Will Book No. 0, 1753-1772 (Reel 36) p. 310-311.)

 

Will of William Echols, Sr.              Halifax County, Virginia

"....being in perfect mind and memory..."

"I lend to Sarah Echols my wife my land I now live on together with my corn mill thereon with all my movable estate, debts due by account, also Robert, my molatto slave during her life. At her decease estate to be equally divded among all my children thats now living and Abner Echols and Sarah Echols my grandchildren co equal with my children thats now living. I give the same land mill & all other apurtenances thereunto belonging to my grandson Joseph Kerbey son of my daughter Judith deceased and to his heirs. To Abner Nichols my grandson a certain tract lying in Pittsylvania County whereon Richard Brown now lives containing 400 acres. To Sarah Echols my granddaughter one certain tract of land in Halifax County on n s Bannister River purchased of Robert Wood.

Exr: John and William Echols my sons and Moses Hendrick my son in law.

 

8 April 1771 s/ Wm. Echols

Wit: George Brown, George Combs, Minor Winn

16 May 1771 Presented by executors and proved by wit

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

More About William Echols and Sarah Turner:

Marriage: Abt. 1710

     

Children of William Echols and Sarah Turner are:

       31           i.      Hannah Echols, born Abt. 1734; died in South Carolina; married Vardry McBee Dec 1758 in Bristol Parrish, Dinwiddie Co., VA.

                     ii.      John Echols, born Unknown.

 

Notes for John Echols:

John was one of the biggest men ever raised in Virginia. He was a Quaker preacher. He probably never had children, his wife died before he did because in his will he left his property to the Quakers and his niece

 

                    iii.      Elcanah Echols, born Unknown.

                    iv.      William Echols, born Unknown.

                     v.      daughter Echols, born Unknown; died Unknown; married Richard Anderson; born Unknown; died Unknown.

                    vi.      Ruth Echols, born Unknown; married Moses Hendrick.

                   vii.      daughter Echols, born Unknown; married William Wayne.

 

Back to Generation 5

"Here's to all them that we LOVE
Here's to all them that LOVE us.
And here's to all them that LOVE those that LOVE them
LOVE those that LOVE them that LOVE us."