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A Journey Back In Time

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Ancestors of Louis Alford "Lute" Horn

Arms of Hugh le Bigod b. abt. 1186 d. Feb. 1245
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GENERATION 21

ARMS of Geoffrey fitz Piers b. abt. 1162 d. June
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GENERATION 21

Arms of William Marshall, 4th Earl of Pembroke
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GENERRATION 22

Generations  21-25

 

      1114178.  Ernald (III) de Bois, born 1190 in Assington, Suffolk, England.  He married 1114179. Joan de Beauchamp.

      1114179.  Joan de Beauchamp, born 1192 in Standlake, Oxfordshire, England.

     

Child of Ernald de Bois and Joan de Beauchamp is:

       557089   i.      Joan de Bois, born 1223 in Thorpe Arnold, Leicestershire, England; married Thomas de Astley.

 

 

      1114192.  Walcherine de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1194; died 14 Apr 1236.  He was the son of 2228384. Walter de Beauchamp and 2228385. Bertha de Braiose.  He married 1114193. Joane de Mortimer.

      1114193.  Joane de Mortimer (Source: C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 30.), born Abt. 1189; died 1268.  She was the daughter of 2228386. 2nd Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Roger and 2228387. Isabel de Ferrers.

     

Child of Walcherine de Beauchamp and Joane de Mortimer is:

       557096   i.      William de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1215; died 07 Jan 1268; married Isabel de Maudit.

 

 

      1114196.  Geoffrey fitz Piers, Earl of Essex (Source: (1) Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700., (2) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants, A Prosopography of Persons Occuring in English Documents, 1066-1166, Volume II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Boydell Press, 2002), pg. 681., (3) Transcribed by Colin Hinson, The English Peerage (to 1790) or, a view of the Ancient and Present State of the English Nobility (genuki: UK & Ireland Genealogical Information Service, 1790., (4) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 353.), born Abt. 1162 in Walden, Essex, England; died 02 Oct 1213.  He was the son of 2228392. Piers de Lutegareshale and 2228393. Maud de Mandeville.  He married 1114197. Aveline de Clare Bef. 25 Jan 1185 in England.

      1114197.  Aveline de Clare (Source: Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700.), born Abt. 1162 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England; died 04 Jun 1225.  She was the daughter of 2228394. Roger "the Good Earl", 3rd Earl of Hertford and 2228395. Maud de St. Hilary.

 

Notes for Geoffrey fitz Piers, Earl of Essex:

Justicair of England, between 1198 and 1213.

1st Earl FitzPiers of Essex, between 1199 and 1213.

 He was girt with a sword, as Earl of Essex, by King John on his coronation on 26 June 1199

 

More About Geoffrey fitz Piers, Earl of Essex:

Burial: Shouldam Priory

 

More About Geoffrey Piers and Aveline de Clare:

Marriage: Bef. 25 Jan 1185, England

     

Child of Geoffrey Piers and Aveline de Clare is:

       557098   i.      Lord of Berkhamstead John FitzPiers, born Bef. 1213 in Shere, Surrey, England; died 23 Nov 1238; married Isabel le Bigod Aft. 1230 in Norfolk, England.

 

 

      1114198.  3rd Earl of Norfolk Hugh le Bigod (Source: (1) John S. Wurts, Magna Charta (P.O. Box 4933, Philadelphia, PA: Brookfield Publishing Company, 1954).., (2) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 53., (3) Transcribed by Colin Hinson, The English Peerage (to 1790) or, a view of the Ancient and Present State of the English Nobility (genuki: UK & Ireland Genealogical Information Service, 1790)., (4) Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 311., (5) Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 311, Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 311.), born Abt. 1186 in Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Feb 1245 in England.  He was the son of 2228396. 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Roger Bigod and 2228397. Ida (Isabel) Plantagenet.  He married 1114199. Countess of Norfolk Maud Marshal 1207.

      1114199.  Countess of Norfolk Maud Marshal (Source: (1) With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America., (2) .B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 628., (3) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, B:xP, pg. 53., (4) John S. Wurts, Magna Charta (P.O. Box 4933, Philadelphia, PA: Brookfield Publishing Company, 1954).), born Abt. 1192; died 27 Mar 1248.  She was the daughter of 2228398. William Marshal and 2228399. Countess of Pembroke Isabel de Clare.

 

Notes for 3rd Earl of Norfolk Hugh le Bigod:

He was heir to the Earldoms of Norfolk and Suffolk circa 1215.

 He was was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta, at Runnymede on 15 June 1215.

3rd Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk between 1221 and 1245Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk and Earl Marshall of England.     Hugh Bigod was one of the 25 sureties of the Magna Charta.    "Of the family of Hugh Bigod, or Bigot, some account has already been given . . . since he was the eldest son of Roger, Earl of Norfolk, whose Arms, Or, a Cross Gules, he bore . . ..

    "Hugh Bigod succeeded to his father’s estates in 1220-21, the 5th year of Henry III. There are but few particulars of this Baron’s life extant, for he enjoyed the title of Earl of Norfolk but a very few years, since he died in 1224-25, the 9th of Henry III . . .."

 

Hugh married in 1207 to Maud Marshal, Marshall of England, daughter of Sir William Marshal. 

 

 

Hugh Bigod, first Earl of Norfolk, survived his father's death by 70 years and must have been quite a young child when he died. Little is heard of him for many years until 1122, when he is named as Constable of Norwich Castle and Governor of the City when it obtained a charter from the Crown. He was to soon make up for this quiet start during the civil wars of Stephen and Matilda where he appears to have surpassed even his fellow Barons with his acts of treachery which he maintained throughout his life. His first major action was on the death of Henry I in 1135. He hastened to England and swore to Archbishop William Corbois that the dying King, after some quarrel with his daughter Matilda, had disinherited her and named Stephen of Blois his successor. Stephen's arrival in England soon settled the matter and he was crowned King. At first Stephen's energy managed to keep his followers together, but after a bout of sickness, reports of his death soon started the Barons squabbling.

 

Bigod was the first to take up arms and he quickly seized Norwich. Stephen was quick to recover and promptly laid siege to the city and Hugh was compelled to surrender. Stephen spared Bigod and for a short time he remained faithful. In 1140 he declared for the Empress Matilda and stood a siege in his castle at Bungay, yet the following year he was fighting in Stephen's army at the Battle of Lincoln. For the next few years he remained in his lands in East Anglia and even settled a squabble in 1148 between Stephen and Archbishop Theobald who he had invited to his new castle at Framlingham. Five years later in 1153 Hugh joined the side of Henry of Anjou who had landed and asserted his claim to the crown. Stephen quickly took Ipswich but was not in any position to punish the rebel Bigod, who later managed to escape.

 

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The following is an excerpt from Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Page 311:

 

    "Of the family of Hugh Bigod, or Bigot, some account has already been given . . . since he was the eldest son of Roger, Earl of Norfolk, whose Arms, Or, a Cross Gules, he bore . . ..

    "Hugh Bigod succeeded to his father’s estates in 1220-21, the 5th year of Henry III. There are but few particulars of this Baron’s life extant, for he enjoyed the title of Earl of Norfolk but a very few years, since he died in 1224-25, the 9th of Henry III . . .."

 

Hugh married in 1207 to Maud Marshal, Marshall of England, daughter of Sir William Marshal.  Please click on Marshal for Maud Marshal's descent.

Hugh and Maud had the following children:

 

 

 

 

 

Notes for Countess of Norfolk Maud Marshal:

Maud, Countess of Norfolk was daughter and co-heir of William Marshal

Heiress of Catherlogh in Leinster, Ireland, between 16 March 1219 and 1245

 

More About Hugh le Bigod and Maud Marshal:

Marriage 1: 1207

Marriage 2: Abt. 1212, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, England

     

Children of Hugh le Bigod and Maud Marshal are:

                      i.      Isabel DE BIGOD, born Abt. 1222 in Thetford, Norfolk, England; died 1239; married Gilbert DE LACY Abt. 1225 in Norfolk, England; born Abt. 1206 in Dublin, , Ireland; died 1234 in Llanthony, , Wales..

 

More About Gilbert DE LACY:

Burial: Llanthony Priory, Wales

 

More About Gilbert DE LACY and Isabel DE BIGOD:

Marriage: Abt. 1225, Norfolk, England

 

                     ii.      Roger Bigod, 4th Earl of Norfolk

                    iii.      Hugh Bigod, Justiciar of England

                    iv.      Sir Ralph Bigod

                     v.      William Bigod

       557099 vi.      Isabel le Bigod, born Abt. 1222 in Thetford, Norfolk, England; married Lord of Berkhamstead John FitzPiers Aft. 1230 in Norfolk, England.

                   vii.      Earl of Norfolk Roger

                  viii.      Hugh le Bigod, Chief Justiciar of England

 

 

      1114202.  Humphrey de Bohun V  He married 1114203. Maud d'Eu.

      1114203.  Maud d'Eu, died 14 Aug 1241.  She was the daughter of 2228406. Raoul I de Lusignan and 2228407. Alice d'Eu.

     

Child of Humphrey de Bohun and Maud d'Eu is:

       557101   i.      Alice de Bohun, born Abt. 1200; married Roger V de Toeni.

 

 

Generation No. 22

 

      2228384.  Walter de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1173; died 1235.  He was the son of 4456768. William de Beauchamp and 4456769. Joane de St. Valery.  He married 2228385. Bertha de Braiose.

      2228385.  Bertha de Braiose, born Abt. 1151; died 1170.

     

Child of Walter de Beauchamp and Bertha de Braiose is:

       1114192 i.      Walcherine de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1194; died 14 Apr 1236; married Joane de Mortimer.

 

 

      2228386.  2nd Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Roger (Source: (1) With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992), 132C-28., (2) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants, A Prosopography of Persons Occuring in English Documents, 1066-1166, Volume II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Boydell Press, 2002), pg. 601., (3) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 383., (4) The Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur, online www.webexcel.ndirect.co.uk/gwarnant/hanes/chronicle/chronicleintro.htm, 1202.), born Abt. 1158 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, the Welsh Marches, England.; died 1215 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.  He was the son of 4456772. 1st Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Hugh and 4456773. Matilda le Meschin.  He married 2228387. Isabel de Ferrers Bef. 1188.

      2228387.  Isabel de Ferrers (Source: (1) .B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg., (2) With additions and corrections by Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. and assisted by David Faris Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1992), Line 262.29.), born Abt. 1166; died Bef. 29 Apr 1252.  She was the daughter of 4456774. WilliamI, 3rd Earl of Derby and 4456775. Goda de Tosny.

 

Notes for 2nd Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Roger:

Lord of Wigmore in Herefordshire, Welsh Marches, England, between 1188 and 1215. Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur 1202: "In this year ... the Welsh took the castle of Gwerthrynion from Roger de Mortimer and burned it to the ground."

 

Notes for Isabel de Ferrers:

Isabel de Ferrers was sister and heir of Hugh Ferrers, of Oakham, in Rutlandshire, and of Lechelade and Lagebiry in Gloucestershire in England

 

 

More About 2nd Roger and Isabel de Ferrers:

Marriage: Bef. 1188

     

Children of 2nd Roger and Isabel de Ferrers are:

       1114193 i.      Joane de Mortimer, born Abt. 1189; died 1268; married Walcherine de Beauchamp.

                     ii.      Ralph de Mortimer, born 1190.

 

 

      2228392.  Piers de Lutegareshale, born Abt. 1134 in Cherhill, Wiltshire, England; died Bef. 1198.  He married 2228393. Maud de Mandeville Bef. 1162 in England.

      2228393.  Maud de Mandeville, born Bef. 1144.  She was the daughter of 4456786. Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex and 4456787. Rohesia de Vere.

 

More About Piers de Lutegareshale and Maud de Mandeville:

Marriage: Bef. 1162, England

     

Child of Piers de Lutegareshale and Maud de Mandeville is:

       1114196 i.      Geoffrey fitz Piers, Earl of Essex, born Abt. 1162 in Walden, Essex, England; died 02 Oct 1213; married Aveline de Clare Bef. 25 Jan 1185 in England.

 

 

      2228394.  Roger "the Good Earl", 3rd Earl of Hertford  He married 2228395. Maud de St. Hilary.

      2228395.  Maud de St. Hilary

     

Child of Roger Earl" and Maud St. Hilary is:

       1114197 i.      Aveline de Clare, born Abt. 1162 in Hereford, Herefordshire, England; died 04 Jun 1225; married Geoffrey fitz Piers, Earl of Essex Bef. 25 Jan 1185 in England.

 

 

      2228396.  2nd Earl of Norfolk, Roger Bigod (Source: Richard Thomson: An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829; Pages 279 – 280.), died 1221.  He was the son of 4456792. 1st Earl of Norfolk Bigod Hugh, or Bigot and 4456793. Juliana de Vere.  He married 2228397. Ida (Isabel) Plantagenet.

      2228397.  Ida (Isabel) Plantagenet (Source: Richard Thomson:  An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John, London, 1829, page 280.).

 

Notes for 2nd Earl of Norfolk, Roger Bigod:

 "Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, was the son of Hugh, Steward to the Kings Henry I. and II., who was descended from Roger Bigod, or Bigot, who in the time of William I. held several Manors in Norfolk; 6 Lordships in Essex; and and 117 in Sufolk. Camden, in his Remains, Lond. 1636, 4to. page 123, states the name to be Norman, signifying Superstitious, or a Bigot; a word of which the Etymology remains yet uncertain, though it is allowed to have been adopted from that language.

    "Camden adds, that the people of France used to call the Normans Bigods, because at every other word they would swear by God; and hence the family of Bigod coming from Normandy,was known by this national characteristic name.

    "In 1189, the 1st of Richard I., a charter was issued, dated Westminster, Nov. 97th by which Roger Bigod was constituted Earl of Norfolk the office of Steward was also confirmed to him, to gether with several Lordships, for all which he gave the King the sum of 1000 marks or £660 13s. 4d.

    "In the 15th year of the same King, he attended him into Poictou; in 1215 he was one of the Baronial party which exacted from him the Great Charter; and was appointed one of the 25 Securities of that instrument, for which he was excommunicated by Pope Innocent III."

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Roger Bigod, 2nd Earl of Norfolk, built Framlingham circa 1190 - 1210. This revolutionary new castle without a keep reflected crusader experience; and is reminiscent of Byzantine fortresses.  Its vast curtain-wall laced with strong towers enabled a large force including cavalry to be kept in the area of maximum defensibility.

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' By God, sir Earl, you shall either go or hang !'

 

'By God, O King, I shall neither go nor hang !'

 

These are the words that were exchanged between Roger Bigod, fifth Earl of Norfolk, Marshall of England and King Edward I when the Earl refused to serve in Gascony in 1297 while the King went to Flanders. This was a typical outburst from a Bigod whose ancestors dating back to the Norman invasion had played an influential part in the upsets and stability of the crown of England from their Castle at Framlingham.

 

There had been a fortification at Framlingham long before the Normans arrived, perhaps as early as the sixth century, and King Edmund is said to have met the Danes nearby in battle and after sought protection at Framlingham. He was to flee from this stronghold and was later captured and murdered in the forests nearby. Before Domesday it was held by Aelmer, a Thane, and consisted of 24 villagers with a total value of £16. After Domesday under Roger Bigod it had risen to 32 villagers with a value of £36. Excavations for a drain at Framlingham in 1953 uncovered 25 skeletons, some with 8th century dress ornaments, which are thought to belong to the Saxon cemetery.

 

The first Norman building to appear here was a classic motte and bailey castle of timber, put up using local materials. The earth would have been dug from the ditches and piled up on the inner side which were then faced and topped with timber palisading. This would have soon been replaced with stone, which was not only stronger but made an attack more difficult. It also gave the local population a sure reminder of who was in charge.

 

The local Saxons seemed to have adjusted well to the transition to Norman rule and suffered far less than others in the surrounding districts. The Bigods became Warlords of East Anglia, taunting sucessive Kings from their refortified castle at Framlingham., and the Howards, who later took over Framlingham as Dukes of Norfolk, also had their fair share of troubles at the castle.

 

The first Bigod to appear in history is Robert le Bigod, a poor Knight, who gained the favour of William the Bastard, Duke of Normandy, by informing him of the intended treachery of William, Count of Mortain. Robert held the lands of Malitot, Loges and Chanon in Normandy and served Duke William as one of his seneschals. He is described at the Battle of Hastings as;

 

'Small of body, but brave and bold, he assaulted the English gallantly'

 

His son, Roger is also believed to have served on the Field of Hastings although there is no mention of him in English records before 1079. He was endowed with the forfieted estates of the Earl of Norfolk, Ralph de Guader who's downfall took place in 1074. In the Domesday Book he appears as holding six lordships in Essex, and 117 in Suffolk. In 1101 he was given the estates of Framlingham by Henry I which were to become the principal stronghold of the Bigods for more than 200 years. Roger Bigod died in 1107, and was suceeded by his eldest son, Willaim Bigod. He drowned in the wreck of the White ship on 26th November 1120 and Roger's second son, Hugh Bigod inherited all and took possession of the estates.

 

 

A reconstruction of life inside Framlingham by Alan Sorrell

 

In 1154 Henry of Anjou was crowned Henry II and Bigod's earldom and lands at Framlingham were confirmed, but he was soon to start his usual tricks again which Henry soon put down. In 1157 Henry marched into East Anglia and received the Earls submission and he is not heard of again until 1169 when he is named among those excommunicated by Thomas Becket.

 

In 1173, Henry's son, the young crowned prince Henry, rebelled and this gave Hugh another chance to cause some trouble. Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester, landed at Walton in Suffolk in September 1173 and marched to Framlingham to join forces with Bigod. Together they took the Castle of Hagnet, but Leicester was captured later by Richard de Lacy, Henry's Justiciar after leaving Framlingham. The other Barons turned on Bigod, and not being strong enough, he managed to buy them off thus ensuring a safe passage for the Flemings in his service.

 

The next year he was in the field again with the aid of troops from Philip of Flanders. They laid siege to Norwich, which they soon took by a direct assault and burned, causing Henry II to return home and march on East Anglia. Henry destroyed Bigod's castle at Walton and was marching on Framlingham when Bigod hastily made a submission to the King at Laleham on 25th July 1174. By now Henry's castle at Orford, 12 miles away, was complete, so he had Framlingham destroyed and Hugh Bigod ceases to appear in history again until his death in 1177 while in the Holy Land with Philip of Flanders.

 

The Gatehouse and curtain wall at Framlingham

 

Henry II confiscated all of Bigod's possessions and his son Roger II appealed with his mother on several occasions for the return of their inheritance. This was denied by Henry and the estates at Framlingham, now with a demolished castle, remained with the crown until Henry's death.

 

On the sucession to the throne of Richard Coer de Lion on 3rd September 1189, Roger Bigod II was taken into favour and by a charter of 27th November, the new King confirmed him in all his honours, the Earldom of Norfolk, and the stewardship of the royal household. It was around this time that the new castle at Framlingham was built. Roger Bigod second Earl of Norfolk was to remain loyal to Richard and in his absence from England on Crusade he supported the King's authority against the designs of Prince John.

 

When John succeeded to the throne Bigod gained John's favour. Although in 1215 he joined the confederate barons in a movement which resulted in the Magna Carta on 15 June 1215, and was one of 25 executors, or trustees, of its provisions. Soon after he was excommunicated by Innocent III along with all the other supporters against King John. The following year King John attacked the castle at Framlingham and it surrendered after 2 days, the defeated garrison consisting of 26 Knights, 20 Men-at-arms, 7 crossbowmen, a chaplain and 3 others. Roger had to wait until Henry III succeeded to the throne before Framlingham was returned after the Council of Oxford in May 1221 but the following August he died. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Hugh, as third Earl who, however, only survived his father by four years.

 

Another Roger, the fourth Earl, was the grandson, through his mother Matilda, of the great William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke. Being a minor at the time of his father's death he grew up under the care of William Longespee, Earl of Salisbury. In 1237 he greatly distinguished himself by his prowess at the tournament at Blythe , Nottinghamshire, in which the rival barons, North and South had a serious encounter. In 1246 Roger Bigod was invested with the office of Earl Marshal in right of his mother because of the failure of the male line. He served his King at home and abroad and was present at the Battle of Lewis on the King's side but later joined De Montfort and held the castle at Oxford with his followers. Little is heard of him until his death in 1270.

 

The castle wall walk

 

The next owner of Framlingham was another Roger Bigod, 5th earl of Norfolk, who was the nephew of the 4th earl Roger. His life runs in a parallel with that of King Edward I, and his career is closely identified with the constitutional struggle with the crown in which the barons played an important part. When Edward called a meeting of the barons at Salisbury in 1297, with a view to getting their support on an invasion of France, the barons rebelled, with Bigod, true to his familiy tradition, being at the head of the opposition. It was at this meeting that the famous words I opened this page with were spoken between Roger Bigod and Edward I, King of England.

 

'With you, O King, I will gladly go; as belongs to me by hereditary right, I will go in the front of the host before your face'

 

'And without me, you will go with the rest ? '

 

'Without you, O King, I am not bound to go, and go I will not'

 

'By God, sir Earl, you shall either go or hang ! '

 

'By God, O King, I shall neither go nor hang ! '

 

And he didn't go, and he didn't hang, but on his death in 1307, all his estates passed to the crown with the end of the Bigod Earls of Norfolk.

 

Framlingham was administered through relatives of the crown for most of the 14th Century until Thomas Mowbray was made Duke of Norfolk by Richard II in 1397. Mowbray was given Framlingham and other estates, but he died in exile and his son was executed for rebellion against Henry V.

 

His brother, John, was recognised as Duke in 1425 and often lived at Framlingham Castle as did his son and grandson in sucession. Ann Mowbray was engaged to Richard, duke of York, one of the Princes who disappeared in the Tower of London, it was through her that the estate passed to the Howard family.

 

John Howard repaired the royal castle at Framlingham before his death, leading the Royal army at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. His son, Thomas, was captured at the Battle but restored to favour and made Duke after sucessfully leading the new King's Army at Flodden. He rebuilt the fine church in Framlingham to house the Tombs and monuments of his family. The rest of the history of the Howards is briefly covered on my site featuring Arundel Castle, where the two castles histories are closely linked during this period.

 

In 1553, Framlingham castle was given by King Edward VI to his sister Mary Tudor. She stayed at Framlingham while waiting her sucession to the crown, which hung in the balance. Her colours flew over the gateway and thousands of her supporters camped around the castle. The Earl of Arundel arrived to inform her she was Queen, and later the Duke of Norfolk was released from the Tower to return to his estates.

 

In Elizabeth's reign the castle was used as a prison for Priests who defied the Church of England, before being returned to the Howards in 1613. The days of Glory and pomp at Framlingham were over and the Howards preferred their new house at Kenninghall in Norfolk. The castle was leased and finally sold to Robert Hitchen in 1635.

 

When he died his will ordered the castle to be pulled down except for it's outer walls and a poorhouse was to be built inside. He was also responsible for the building of the Almshouses in Framlingham, which still survive today. The castle was leased to various groups and societies for meetings, after the poorhouse was redundant. It was then owned by Pembroke college. It passed into the care of the state in 1913 and was later given to English Heritage, who run the castle today.

 

 

 

 

     

Children of Roger Bigod and Ida Plantagenet are:

       1114198 i.      3rd Earl of Norfolk Hugh le Bigod, born Abt. 1186 in Thetford, Norfolk, England; died Feb 1245 in England; married Countess of Norfolk Maud Marshal 1207.

                     ii.      Margaret Bigod

                    iii.      Margery Bigod

                    iv.      Alice Bigod

                     v.      William Bigod

                    vi.      Ralph Bigod

                   vii.      Roger Bigod

 

 

      2228398.  William Marshal  He married 2228399. Countess of Pembroke Isabel de Clare Aug 1189 in London, England.

      2228399.  Countess of Pembroke Isabel de Clare

 

Notes for William Marshal:

There is much scholarly controversy about the dating and patronage of the Castle. According to Toy, the inner bailey including the keep, was built "about 1200 or in the early years of the thirteenth century", and the outer Bailey during the first half of the 13th century (p 119) Thompson says it was probably built by William Marshal, earl of Pembroke and Stirguil.

 

More About William Marshal and Isabel de Clare:

Marriage: Aug 1189, London, England

     

Children of William Marshal and Isabel de Clare are:

       1114199 i.      Countess of Norfolk Maud Marshal, born Abt. 1192; died 27 Mar 1248; married 3rd Earl of Norfolk Hugh le Bigod 1207.

                     ii.      William Marshal

                    iii.      Richard Marshal

                    iv.      Gilbert Marshal

                     v.      Walter Marshal

                    vi.      Anselm Marshall

                   vii.      Lady Isabella Marshal

                  viii.      Sibyl Marshal

                    ix.      Eva Marshal

                     x.      Joan Marshal

 

 

      2228406.  Raoul I de Lusignan  He married 2228407. Alice d'Eu.

      2228407.  Alice d'Eu, died 15 May 1246.

     

Child of Raoul de Lusignan and Alice d'Eu is:

       1114203 i.      Maud d'Eu, died 14 Aug 1241; married Humphrey de Bohun V.

 

 

Generation No. 23

 

      4456768.  William de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1130; died 1212.  He was the son of 8913536. William I de Beauchamp and 8913537. Maud de Braiose.  He married 4456769. Joane de St. Valery.

      4456769.  Joane de St. Valery, born Abt. 1154.

     

Child of William de Beauchamp and Joane St. Valery is:

       2228384 i.      Walter de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1173; died 1235; married Bertha de Braiose.

 

 

      4456772.  1st Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Hugh  He married 4456773. Matilda le Meschin.

      4456773.  Matilda le Meschin

     

Child of 1st Hugh and Matilda le Meschin is:

       2228386 i.      2nd Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Roger, born Abt. 1158 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, the Welsh Marches, England.; died 1215 in Wigmore, Herefordshire, England; married Isabel de Ferrers Bef. 1188.

 

 

      4456774.  WilliamI, 3rd Earl of Derby (Source: (1) Stewart, RE: de Ferrers/Peverell/Braose in "RE: de Ferrers/Peverell/Braose", newsgroup message to soc.genealogy.medieval,., (2) Braose Family Web, online http://freespace.virgin.net/doug.thompson/BraoseWeb/..), born Abt. 1136 in Tutbury, Staffordshire, England; died Bet. 31 Dec 1189 - 21 Oct 1190 in Acre, Palestine.  He was the son of 8913548. Robert de Ferrers, 2nd earl of Derby and 8913549. Margaret Peverel.  He married 4456775. Goda de Tosny Abt. 1162.

      4456775.  Goda de Tosny, born Abt. 1140 in Eggington, Derbyshire, England.  She was the daughter of 8913550. Robert de Tosny.

 

Notes for WilliamI, 3rd Earl of Derby:

Died while on the 3rd Crusade. 3rd Earl of Derby in England, before 1190.

 

More About William and Goda de Tosny:

Marriage: Abt. 1162

     

Children of William and Goda de Tosny are:

       2228387 i.      Isabel de Ferrers, born Abt. 1166; died Bef. 29 Apr 1252; married 2nd Baron Mortimer of Wigmore Roger Bef. 1188.

                     ii.      Milisent de Ferrers

 

 

      4456786.  Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex (Source: (1) Studies in Heraldry: European Rolls of Arms of the Thirteenth Century, online www.briantimms.com\era\early rolls of arms.htm, Glover's Roll,, Studies in Heraldry: European Rolls of Arms of the Thirteenth Century, online www.briantimms.com\era\early rolls of arms.htm, Glover's Roll, for the Earls of Essex., (2) .B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 352., (3) .S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants: Some Corrigenda (n.p.: n.pub., October 2002).., (4) Transcribed by Colin Hinson, The English Peerage (to 1790) or, a view of the Ancient and Present State of the English Nobility (genuki: UK & Ireland, Transcribed by Colin Hinson, The English Peerage (to 1790) or, a view of the Ancient and Present State of the English Nobility (genuki: UK & Ireland Genealogical Information Service, 1790). Hereinafter cited as English Peerage (to 1790). .), born Abt. 1106; died 14 Sep 1144 in Kent, England.  He was the son of 8913572. Willelm de Mandeville and 8913573. Margaret de Normandie.  He married 4456787. Rohesia de Vere Abt. 1121 in England.

      4456787.  Rohesia de Vere, born Abt. 1104 in Hedingham, Essex, England; died Aft. 21 Oct 1166.

 

Notes for Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex:

Steward of Normandy, after 109

He was created, by king Stephen, earl of Essex in 1139.

 1st Earl Mandeville of Essex, between 1139 and 1144.

He had livery of his inheritance, upon paying the sum of £866 13s. 4d. to the crown in 1140 in  Stephen

Upon his excommunication for his many outrages, he besieged the castle of Burwell, and going unhelmed in consequence of the heat of the weather, he was shot in the head with an arrow, a wound of which he afterwards died

 

More About Geoffrey de Mandeville and Rohesia de Vere:

Marriage: Abt. 1121, England

     

Children of Geoffrey de Mandeville and Rohesia de Vere are:

       2228393 i.      Maud de Mandeville, born Bef. 1144; married Piers de Lutegareshale Bef. 1162 in England.

                     ii.      Ernulph de Mandeville

                    iii.      Geoffrey "the Younger" de Mandeville

                    iv.      William de Mandeville

 

 

      4456792.  1st Earl of Norfolk Bigod Hugh, or Bigot (Source: Fredrick Lewis Weis:  The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, Baltimore, 1991.), born Abt. 1095; died 1177 in the Holy Land with Philip of Flanders.  He was the son of 8913584. Roger de Bigod and 8913585. Alice de Toeny.  He married 4456793. Juliana de Vere.

      4456793.  Juliana de Vere  She was the daughter of 8913586. Justiciar of England Aubrey de VereII, Justicar of England and 8913587. Alice de Clare.

 

Notes for 1st Earl of Norfolk Bigod Hugh, or Bigot:

Steward to the Kings Henry I. and II

 

 Hugh was Constable of Norwich Castle and Governor of the City of Norwich in 1122.  He was excommunicated in 1169, and must have been quite an old man  when he died in 1177

     

Child of Bigod Hugh and Juliana de Vere is:

       2228396 i.      2nd Earl of Norfolk, Roger Bigod, died 1221; married Ida (Isabel) Plantagenet.

 

 

Generation No. 24

 

      8913536.  William I de Beauchamp, born 1170.  He was the son of 17827072. Walter de Beauchamp and 17827073. Emmeline d'Arbitot.  He married 8913537. Maud de Braiose.

      8913537.  Maud de Braiose

     

Child of William de Beauchamp and Maud de Braiose is:

       4456768 i.      William de Beauchamp, born Abt. 1130; died 1212; married Joane de St. Valery.

 

 

      8913548.  Robert de Ferrers, 2nd earl of Derby (Source: Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), IX:779.), born Abt. 1100 in Derby, England; died Bef. 1160 in Merevale, Warwickshire, England.  He married 8913549. Margaret Peverel Bef. 1136.

      8913549.  Margaret Peverel (Source: Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), Vol 4. Appendix I (Peverel of Nottingham, pp.762-768.), born Abt. 1114 in Nottingham, England.  She was the daughter of 17827098. William Peverel the Younger and 17827099. Avice de Lancaster.

 

More About Robert de Ferrers and Margaret Peverel:

Marriage: Bef. 1136

     

Child of Robert de Ferrers and Margaret Peverel is:

       4456774 i.      WilliamI, 3rd Earl of Derby, born Abt. 1136 in Tutbury, Staffordshire, England; died Bet. 31 Dec 1189 - 21 Oct 1190 in Acre, Palestine; married Goda de Tosny Abt. 1162.

 

 

      8913550.  Robert de Tosny

     

Child of Robert de Tosny is:

       4456775 i.      Goda de Tosny, born Abt. 1140 in Eggington, Derbyshire, England; married WilliamI, 3rd Earl of Derby Abt. 1162.

 

 

      8913572.  Willelm de Mandeville (Source: (1) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants: Some Corrigenda (n.p.: n.pub., October 2002).., (2) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 352.), born Abt. 1062; died Aft. May 1116.  He was the son of 17827144. Geoffrey I de Mandeville of Pleshy and 17827145. Athelaise de Balts.  He married 8913573. Margaret de Normandie Bef. 1091.

      8913573.  Margaret de Normandie (Source: (1) The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James, online ., printout dated May 30, 1996. Previously published in hard copy (1636 Jamestown Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15235: JANDA Consultants, March 22, 1993., (2) B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 352., (3) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants: Some Corrigenda (n.p.: n.pub., October 2002.), born Abt. 1075.  She was the daughter of 17827146. Eudo Dapifer and 17827147. Rohais de Clare.

 

Notes for Willelm de Mandeville:

Also called de Mandeville A corruption of the orignal name.

 Also called William de Magnavil. Willelm de Mandeville

He succeeded his father as constable of the Tower of London circa 1100.

 He lost the office of constable of the Tower of London when Ranulf, bishop of Durham, escaped from his custody in 1101.

 He was punished by the forfeiture of part of holdings, Walden and Great Waltham in Essex, and Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire.

 

Notes for Margaret de Normandie:

Margaret de Normandie was only daughter and heiress of Eudo, de Rie Dapifer of Normandy.

 Heiress of the Stewardship of Normandy, circa 1091

 

More About Willelm de Mandeville and Margaret de Normandie:

Marriage: Bef. 1091

     

Children of Willelm de Mandeville and Margaret de Normandie are:

       4456786 i.      Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, born Abt. 1106; died 14 Sep 1144 in Kent, England; married Rohesia de Vere Abt. 1121 in England.

                     ii.      Beatrice de Mandeville

 

 

      8913584.  Roger de Bigod (Source: Fredrick Lewis Weis:  The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, Baltimore, 1991.), died 08 Sep 1107.  He was the son of 17827168. Robert le Bigod.  He married 8913585. Alice de Toeny.

      8913585.  Alice de Toeny

 

Notes for Roger de Bigod:

Roger is also believed to have served on the Field of Hastings although there is no mention of him in English records before 1079. He was endowed with the forfieted estates of the Earl of Norfolk, Ralph de Guader who's downfall took place in 1074.

    In the Domesday Book Roger appears as holding six lordships in Essex, and 117 in Suffolk. In 1101 he was given the estates of Framlingham by Henry I which were to become the principal stronghold of the Bigods for more than 200 years. Roger de Bigod died in 1107, and was suceeded by his eldest son, William Bigod. He drowned in the wreck of the White ship on 26th November 1120 and Roger's second son, Hugh Bigod inherited all and took possession of the estates

     

Children of Roger de Bigod and Alice de Toeny are:

       4456792 i.      1st Earl of Norfolk Bigod Hugh, or Bigot, born Abt. 1095; died 1177 in the Holy Land with Philip of Flanders; married Juliana de Vere.

                     ii.      Maud de Bigod

                    iii.      Cicely de Bigod

 

 

      8913586.  Justiciar of England Aubrey de VereII, Justicar of England (Source: (1) The Book of History (18 Volumes), London, 1914., (2) David C. Douglas: William the Conqueror, University of California, 1964., (3) Douglas: William the Conqueror, University of California, 1964. G. A. Moriarty:  The Companions of the Conqueror, The American Genealogist, Oct. 1944.), born 1062; died 15 May 1141 in London. Killed in a riot.  He was the son of 17827172. Aubrey I de Vere and 17827173. Beatrice.  He married 8913587. Alice de Clare.

      8913587.  Alice de Clare  She was the daughter of 17827174. Earl of Clare Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare.

 

Notes for Justiciar of England Aubrey de VereII, Justicar of England:

Aubrey went on the First Crusade in 1098, and it was at this point that the star was added to his coat of arms.  According to legend, darkness was falling over the battlefield, and it appeared the saracens would be saved.  However, a brilliant star appeared on Aubrey de Vere's banner to illuminate the field.  The battle continued, the Crusaders were victorious, and the star became a permanent part of the Arms of de Vere.  Richard Thomson describes the arms as "Quarterly gules and or, in the first quarter a mullet argent".

 

    Aubrey II began the construction of Hedingham castle which was completed by his sons Aubrey III and Robert.

 

The magnificent Norman Castle keep at Hedingham is among one of the best preserved in Europe. It was built by Aubrey de Vere in 1140 and now stands as a enduring monument to the great family of the de Vere earls of Oxford. The castle was built as a stronghold for the family and its walls are 12 feet thick, although strangely, 13 feet thick on the Eastern side. This is believed to be either to keep out the cold easterly winds that are common in this part of the country or to be for extra protection against a possible attack coming from the gatehouse side of the keep. Whatever the reason, the castle was to be a haunting reminder to the local population of their new Norman Lord's great wealth and power

 

Aubrey II, eldest son of Albericus, succeeded his father on his death and was responsible for building the great keep at Hedingham, using the Archbishop of Canterbury, William de Corbeuil as his architect. The keep is faced with Ashlar stone which had to be transported all the way from the quarries of Barnack in Northamptonshire. This was a tricky operation and would have involved great expense to Aubrey, but it ensured the Castle could withstand weather and considerable bombardment before it would yield as well as making it far more attractive to the eye. Very few Norman Castles were faced with stone like Hedingham, only a very few Nobles were as rich and powerful as the de Veres, and normally only the doors and windows were faced with cut stone.

 

The entrance to the keep is on the first floor with the dungeon being outside, opposite the entrance. This first floor entrance is yet another precaution against attack and the Garrison and Guard room were on the ground floor which also served as dwelling space. The main entrance door has a well-defined chevron moulding which is of a typical Norman pattern, these are to be found in various places throughout the castle, each and every one slightly different. After stepping through the entrance door, one is taken immediately into a narrow passage which leads into the Banqueting or Great Hall. The Great Hall would have been used for entertaining guests, giving audiences and holding court and was a natural place for the masons to perform their finest work.. In keeping with the Lords social status, Hedingham was endowed with the largest Norman Arch in Europe.

 

Aubrey II took part in the First Crusade in 1098. There is a legend that while Aubrey was engaged in the fierce battle for Antioch against the Sultan of Persia's troops, darkness was starting to fall and there was great confusion on the battlefield. At the very moment when it seemed the Saracens were about to be saved by the darkness, a brilliant five-pointed star appeared on the standard being carried by de Vere. The battlefield was said to have been completely illuminated, and a great victory was won over the Sultan's troops. I would hardly believe this is true, but the arms of the de Vere family are amongst the most simple and one of the best known in medieval heraldry.

 

Aubrey II married Alice FitzRichard of Clare, (daughter of Gilbet FitzRichard, feudal lord of Clare) and in 1125 Aubrey was made joint Sheriff of London. In 1130 he appears to have been indebted to the crown for a considerable sum after a prisoner he was responsible for escaped. This apparently did him little harm because in 1133 he was created Great Chamberlain of England. As such he attended King Stephen at Westminster and also at Winchester in 1136. The title given was to be hereditary and all subsequent holders of this office were his descendents, although throughout the later middle ages, there were long periods when the de Vere family fell out of favour and didn't properly regain the title until after Bosworth Field.

 

Aubery II was killed in a riot in London in 1141, most probably while his Castle at Hedingham was still being built, he left four sons, Aubery III, Robert, Geoffrey and William and was succeeded by his eldest, Aubrey de Vere III.

 

 

 

 

     

Children of Aubrey de Vere and Alice de Clare are:

       4456793 i.      Juliana de Vere, married 1st Earl of Norfolk Bigod Hugh, or Bigot.

                     ii.      Aubrey III de Vere

 

Notes for Aubrey III de Vere:

Aubrey de Vere, the third, was another Crusader who was known as Aubrey the Grim on account of his height and stern appearance. He was made an earl by the Empress Matilda and was offered a choice of title from either Cambridge, ' Provided the King of the Scots had it not ', Oxford, Berkshire, Wiltshire or Dorset. He chose Oxford and became the 1st earl of Oxford. A title later confirmed by Henry II which was to continue for 20 generations. As well as his title he was also given ' a third of the penny of the pleas of the county, as an earl ought to have '. The new earl was always a keen supporter of the Empress, who frequently came to Hedingham Castle as a visitor and guest of de Vere. The other Matilda, Queen and wife of King Stephen, was another visitor to Hedingham, she died there on the 3rd May 1152, and was later buried at Faversham Abbey, Kent.

 

Aubrey, 2nd earl of Oxford, succeeded in 1194. He fought alongside Richard Coeur de Lion in Normandy and was later to command King John's forces in Ireland, where John had done his best to upset the local Chieftains of the Country. He was Privy Councillor and Steward of the vast estates of Epping Forest in 1213, but he died childless and his brother Robert succeeded him as 3rd earl of Oxford.

 

 

 

                    iii.      Geoffrey de Vere, Lord of Clun

                    iv.      Robert de Vere

                     v.      William de Vere, Bishop of Hereford

                    vi.      Gilbert de Vere

                   vii.      Alice de Vere

                  viii.      Rohese de Vere

 

 

Generation No. 25

 

      17827072.  Walter de Beauchamp, born Bef. 1066.  He was the son of 35654144. Hugh de Beauchamp.  He married 17827073. Emmeline d'Arbitot.

      17827073.  Emmeline d'Arbitot

     

Child of Walter de Beauchamp and Emmeline d'Arbitot is:

       8913536 i.      William I de Beauchamp, born 1170; married Maud de Braiose.

 

 

      17827098.  William Peverel the Younger (Source: (1) Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), Vol 4. Appendix I (Peverel of Nottingham, pp.762-768., (2) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants, A Prosopography of Persons Occuring in English Documents, 1066-1166, Volume II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Boydell Press, 2002), pg. 539, 603., (3) Somerset Herald J.R. Planché, The Conqueror and His Companions (London, England: Tinsley Brothers, 1874).), born Abt. 1080 in Nottingham, England..  He was the son of 35654196. Lord of Nottingham William Peverel the Elder and 35654197. Adelina of Lancaster:.  He married 17827099. Avice de Lancaster Abt. 1112 in La Marche, Normandy, France.

      17827099.  Avice de Lancaster  She was the daughter of 35654198. Baron Kendal of Workingto Willelm filius Gilberti and 35654199. Gundred de Warenne.

 

Notes for William Peverel the Younger:

  Lord of Nottingham William Peverel the Younger was one of the principal supportors of King Stephen.

He was a commander at the Battle of the Standard on 22 August 1138 in Cowton Moor, north of Northallerton, Yorkshire, England.

 He was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lincoln on 2 February 1141 in Lincolnshire, England.1 He saw his estates forfeired for a time, and his castle of Nottingham was committed by the Empress Maud to William, but he recovered it in 1143.

 He was supposedly, "as men said," the one who poisoned Ranulf de Gernham, Earl of Chester, on 16 December 1153.

 He was dispossessed of his estates by King Henry II, for conspiring with Maud, Countess of Chester, to poison her husband, Ranulph Gernons, Earl of Chester, but more probably to punish him for what had previously been termed his wickedness and treason in 1155

 

More About William Younger and Avice de Lancaster:

Marriage: Abt. 1112, La Marche, Normandy, France

     

Children of William Younger and Avice de Lancaster are:

       8913549 i.      Margaret Peverel, born Abt. 1114 in Nottingham, England; married Robert de Ferrers, 2nd earl of Derby Bef. 1136.

                     ii.      Henry Peverel

 

 

      17827144.  Geoffrey I de Mandeville of Pleshy (Source: (1) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants: Some Corrigenda., (2) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 352., (3) Revised by others later George Edward Cokayne The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, I-XIII (in 6) (Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, GL5 2BU: Sutton Publishing Limited, 2000), XII/1, App. L, pg. 47-48.), born Abt. 1030; died Abt. 1100.  He married 17827145. Athelaise de Balts Bef. 1060.

      17827145.  Athelaise de Balts, born Abt. 1038.

 

Notes for Geoffrey I de Mandeville of Pleshy:

Also called Geoffrey de Magnavil.2 Geoffrey

He possessed the town of Magnavil before 1066 in Normandy.

 He may have accompanied William the Conqueror to England, but is not recorded in the records as having fought at Hastings on 14 October 1066.

 He received, as his share of England, diverse domains in Berkshire, Suffolk, Middlesex, Surrey, Cambridge, Oxford, Hertshire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, and Essex after 1067.

 He established Waldene as the family seat after 1067.

 He founded a Benedictine monastery, conferring upon it the whole lordship of the place, and woods adjoining thereto, after 1067 in Hurley, Berkshire, England.

 Constable of the Tower of London, after 1067.

 

More About Geoffrey Pleshy and Athelaise de Balts:

Marriage: Bef. 1060

     

Children of Geoffrey Pleshy and Athelaise de Balts are:

       8913572 i.      Willelm de Mandeville, born Abt. 1062; died Aft. May 1116; married Margaret de Normandie Bef. 1091.

                     ii.      Beatrice de Magnavil

 

 

      17827146.  Eudo Dapifer (Source: (1) Somerset Herald J.R. Planché, The Conqueror and His Companions (London, England: Tinsley Brothers, 1874).., (2) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants: Some Corrigenda., (3) The Paternal Ancestry of Homer Beers James, online ., printout dated May 30, 1996. Previously published in hard copy (1636 Jamestown Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15235: JANDA Consultants, March 22, 1993., (4) C.B., LL.D., Ulster King of Arms Sir Bernard Burke, compiler, A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1996), pg. 352., (5) .S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants, A Prosopography of Persons Occuring in English Documents, 1066-1166, Volume II. Pipe Rolls to Cartae Baronum (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: The Boydell Press, 2002), pg. 400.), born Abt. 1046.  He married 17827147. Rohais de Clare Abt. 1090.

      17827147.  Rohais de Clare (Source: (1) K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday Descendants., (2) Somerset Herald J.R. Planché, The Conqueror and His Companions (London, England: Tinsley Brothers, 1874).), born Aft. 1066; died 07 Jan 1121.  She was the daughter of 35654294. Justiciar of England Richard fitz Gilbert and 35654295. Rohesia Giffard.

 

Notes for Eudo Dapifer:

Also called Eudo Dapifer.

Also called Eudo de Normandie

 

More About Eudo Dapifer and Rohais de Clare:

Marriage: Abt. 1090

     

Child of Eudo Dapifer and Rohais de Clare is:

       8913573 i.      Margaret de Normandie, born Abt. 1075; married Willelm de Mandeville Bef. 1091.

 

 

      17827168.  Robert le Bigod, born Abt. 1066.

 

Notes for Robert le Bigod:

The first Bigod to appear in history is Robert le Bigod, a poor Knight, who gained the favour of William, Duke of Normandy, by informing him of the intended treachery of William Werlenc, Count of Mortain. Robert held the lands of Malitot, Loges and Chanon in Normandy and served Duke William as one of his seneschals. He is described at the Battle of Hastings as; "Small of body, but brave and bold, he assaulted the English gallantly

     

Child of Robert le Bigod is:

       8913584 i.      Roger de Bigod, died 08 Sep 1107; married Alice de Toeny.

 

 

      17827172.  Aubrey I de Vere (Source: (1) Norman F. Cantor (ed.): The Encyclopædia of the Middle Ages, New York, 1999., (2) Kenneth M. Setton (ed.):  The Age of Chivalry, National Geographic Society, 1969.), born Bef. 1040; died 1112 in Colne Priory.  He married 17827173. Beatrice.

      17827173.  Beatrice

 

Notes for Aubrey I de Vere:

The family was founded in England by Aubrey 'Albericus' de Vers, who obtained vast estates from William the Conqueror in 1066. These estates were once the property of Ulwine, a great Saxon thane, and consisted of manors in the counties of Essex, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire and Middlesex which is now part of modern London. The de Veres were also Lords of Kensington in modern London and nearby Earl's Court is where they had their court-house. To this day there is a quite exclusive area of Kensington called de Vere Gardens.

 

Surprisingly little is known about Albericus de Ver, it is said that he married Beatrice, half sister of King William, and they had five sons. However, there is little evidence to support this and much of the earlier life of Albericus and Beatrice is unknown. He founded Earl's Colne Priory in 1105, and after the death of Beatrice he became a Monk. He is also said to be responsible for laying out four new vineyards in England, one being at Hedingham, where wild red grapes have been found several times during the last century. He died peacefully at Earl's Colne Priory

 

     

Child of Aubrey de Vere and Beatrice is:

       8913586 i.      Justiciar of England Aubrey de VereII, Justicar of England, born 1062; died 15 May 1141 in London. Killed in a riot; married Alice de Clare.

 

 

      17827174.  Earl of Clare Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare

     

Child of Earl of Clare Gilbert FitzRichard de Clare is:

            8913587          i.            Alice de Clare, married Justiciar of England Aubrey de VereII, Justicar of England.

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